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Intestate succession laws?

Griffin, GA |

My grandfather passed in 1987 left all to my grandmother. She then passed in 2007 without a will. It was later found out that she was not my blood relative. So I have someone as a blood relative to her trying to take everything. As a grandkid to my grandfather which helped get the property in question am I entitled to anything?

Attorney Answers 4


  1. If you are not related then under the laws of intestate succession you may not be entitled to anything. If she had a will she could have named you or defined who were her descendants. Intestate law is much more rigid in its rules. This is why wills are drafted. Finally, laws vary from state to state so you would be well served to discuss this matter with an estates attorney in the state where the decedent died.

    Hope this helps.

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    Mr. Fromm is licensed to practice law throughout the state of PA with offices in Philadelphia and Montgomery Counties. He is authorized to handle IRS matters throughout the United States. His phone number is 215-735-2336 or his email address is sjfpc@comcast.net , his website for more tax, estate and business articles is www.sjfpc.com. and his blog is

    LEGAL DISCLAIMER Mr. Fromm is licensed to practice law throughout the state of PA with offices in Philadelphia and Montgomery Counties. He is authorized to handle IRS matters throughout the United States. His phone number is 215-735-2336 or his email address is sjfpc@comcast.net , his website is www.sjfpc.com. and his blog is <http://frommtaxes.wordpress.com/> Mr. Fromm is ethically required to state that the response herein is not legal advice and does not create an attorney/ client relationship. Also, there are no recognized legal specialties under Pennsylvania law. Any references to a trust, estate or tax lawyer refer only to the fact that Mr. Fromm limits his practice to these areas of the law. These responses are only in the form of legal education and are intended to only provide general information about the matter within the question. Oftentimes the question does not include significant and important facts and timelines that if known could significantly change the reply or make such reply unsuitable. Mr. Fromm strongly advises the questioner to confer with an attorney in their state in order to ensure proper advice is received. By using this site you understand and agree that there is no attorney client relationship or confidentiality between you and the attorney responding. This site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney that practices in the subject area in your jurisdiction, who is familiar with your specific facts and all of the circumstances and with whom you have an attorney client relationship. The law changes frequently and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The information and materials provided are general in nature, and may not apply to a specific factual or legal circumstance described in the question or omitted from the question. Circular 230 Disclaimer - Any information in this comment may not be used to eliminate or reduce penalties by the IRS or any other governmental agency.


  2. This is why EVERYONE practically needs estate planning - WITH AN ATTORNEY NOT- SELF-HELP SERVICE

    Don't know how this can be dragging out 5 years later, was there never a probate??

    Do you have counsel already??

    If you had a probate 4 years ago and found no-blood now - check with local counsel to see if open.

    You should spell out facts to us so we can evaluate

    If matter is still open - outcome may be negative - but cannot say anything without facts laid out

    This does not create an attorney/client relationship. This does not constitue legal advice. It is limited to facts of the question. You should consult an attorney in the appropriate state involved before making any decisions based on this answer


  3. Under Georgia intestacy law you are not an heir at law if you are not a blood or adopted grandchild of the woman you believe to be your grandmother. This is a sad and unfortunate situation. As another attorney responding to your question said, this is one reason it is so important that people have a well drafted will in place at their passing.


  4. Unfortunately, unless you are a blood relative you are not an heir and do not inherit anything absent a will.

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