In Real Estate Case can the wife be the witness for the Defendant? he does not hire attorney decided to defendant himself

Asked 9 months ago - Seattle, WA

Deceased Mother-in law never wrote a WILL, but the sister-in law says mother wrote a WILL on her.
My husband is the Defendant. My Sister in law is the Plaintiff has a forged WILL.
My husband fights the case by himself so can I be witness for him

Attorney answers (4)

  1. V. Jonas Urba

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    Contributor Level 13

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    Answered . Anyone can be a witness in a case but their testimony may carry little weight if the proper questions are not asked in the correct form. For example, if your husband asks you a bunch of leading questions he could unkowingly destroy his own case. Follow the suggestions of attorneys on this site. Hire a lawyer.

    Not legal advice / No lawyer/client relationship.
  2. Shawn B Alexander

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . You need an attorney to start to find what is wrong with picture. If the court takes a dim view of what is being presented or doesn't understand your case will fail at lease give yourself a chance and get someone who has experience and training.
    Good Luck

    Please be sure to indicate the best answer. If this answer was helpful, please mark as helpful below. Only. If... more
  3. Donna R Blaustein

    Contributor Level 13

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    Answered . Your husband should hire an attorney to represent him in this matter. Your husband would not think of operating on himself if he needed surgerty - why would he represent himself if he is not a lawyer?

    The above answer is not to be considered legal advice and should not be relied upon as such. You should consult... more
  4. Keith G Langer

    Contributor Level 19

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    Lawyers agree

    Answered . This is not a case for a layman to try and litigate. Call the Seattle and WA bar associations for referrals to probate attorneys.

    The foregoing is for general information purposes and does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

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