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In NJ , can i get my license restored any sooner then the 10yrs for my 3rd DUI yrs ago ?

Clementon, NJ |

got my 3rd DUI almost 3yrs ago . served my 6 month sentence and still paying fines

Attorney Answers 7

Posted

The penalty for a 3rd DUI w/in 10 years is a 10-year loss of license. That's the penalty the legislature decided on, in part reasoning that people who can't seem to stop driving drunk shouldn't be doing any driving...at least, not for ten years. The idea being, a 3rd-time offender would learn to stop drinking and driving.

The foregoing is not legal advice, and nothing in the foregoing shall be deemed to create an attorney client relationship. If you feel you need to speak with an attorney regarding your issue, it is recommended that you contact an attorney with expertise in your area of inquiry. The information related above is purely for informational purposes, and should not be acted upon without speaking with qualified counsel familiar with you specific situation and the laws related thereto.

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Steven Todd Keppler

Steven Todd Keppler

Posted

Correction: one of the penalties for a 3rd DUI conviction w/in 10 years is a the 10-year loss of license. As you're already aware, 180 days in jail, plus fines, are also on the table.

Posted

Under the current sentancing law, you cannot get your license back until the 10 years has passed. There would need to be a change in the law to permit getting the license back earlier.

Law Offices of James A. Abate Jabatelaw.com (732) 412-2364

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Posted

No. But you might be able file a PCR on convictions under 5 years old. A new proposed law may give you some relief. But I do not know if it will apply to your situation and it is not passed as yet.

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Posted

No

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Posted

Unfortunately no.

DISCLAIMER This answer is provided for educational purposes only. By using or participating in this site you agree and understand that there is no attorney client privilege between you and the attorney responding. This site cannot be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney that practices law in the State where this offense is charged; and, who has experience in the area of law you are asking questions about and with whom you would have an attorney client relationship. The law changes frequently and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The information and materials provided are general in nature, and may not apply to a specific factual or legal circumstance described in the question, or in the State where this charge is filed. I am an attorney licensed to practice in the State of New Jersey. Consult a local attorney if your case arises outside the State of New Jersey. If you found this answer to be HELPFUL then you can vote that this answer was helpful. If you found this answer to be the BEST ANSWER of all those presented, then you can vote that this answer was the best answer presented. Also, please be advised that any response to any comments made by the asker do not create an attonrey client relationship.

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Posted

The legislature and courts are pretty clear on this. As the law stands today you are out of luck until you satisfy the terms of the judgment.

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Posted

The short answer is no! However, the is a procedure known as post conviction relief (PCR), in which a person may be able to reopen a prior conviction. In order to file a PCR application, a person must be within 5 years of their conviction. If outside the 5 years, you must show "excusable neglect," as a reason for not attacking it ealier. The most common type of PCR application is "ineffective assistance of counsel."

A defendant claiming incompetent representation must demonstrate first that counsel’s performance was deficient, that is, “counsel made errors so serious that counsel was not functioning as the ‘counsel’ guaranteed by the “Sixth Amendment.” To satisfy this component, the defendant must show that counsel’s performance fell below and objective standard of reasonableness, as measured by prevailing norms, considering all of the surrounding circumstances. A defendant challenging counsel’s performance must identify the particular conduct alleged to have been unreasonable and overcome a “strong presumption” that counsel acted within the “wide range” of reasonable professional conduct. Id. at 688-89. The second prong requires a defendant to demonstrate that counsel’s performance prejudiced defense to the extent that defendant was deprived of a fair trial to the extent that the result would have been different.

The key is to have your file reviewed by a season DWI lawyer, not just a general practitioner who may not be familar with all the in and outs of DWI defenses. This would require reviewing the discovery and researching what motions the original attorney filed....if any.

At the Hernandez Law Firm, we specialize in DW(I defense, al,ost exclusively. Steven Hernandez is a certified Alcotest Operator and owns not only the Alcotest 7110, but the Breathalyzer 900 and 900A. In addition, Mr. Hernandez is a certified field sobrity instructor. With these skills he will be able to determine whether you are a candidate for PCR. Mr. Hernandez can be reached at 732-286-2700.

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