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If you are married for 6 years with no kids do you have to pay alimony?

Bakersfield, CA |
Filed under: Divorce

just wondering if the laws have changed. It used to be 10 or more

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

For a marriage of less than 10 years, the general rule is that spousal support may be ordered for half the duration of the matrimony.

At the temporary, or pendente lite, stage of the dissolution, the Court will look primarily to the parties' respective incomes. A permanent spousal support award is theoretically governed by Fam C §4320.

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Posted

You are mistaken. In California there has never been a 10 year rule for paying spousal support. The 10 year rule only determines whether or not you pay for a defined term (1/2 the length of the marriage) or indefinitely. Whether or not you would be required to pay spousal support depends primarily on the differences in income of the parties. Permanent support will also be determined based on the the factors contained in Family Code Section 4320. How long you pay is negotiable but generally in short term marriages is 1/2 the length of the marriage.

Michael Schwerin, San Jose, California phone: 408-295-4232 email: schwerin@ix.netcom.com. Consultation fees, rates and retainers vary based on need and ability to pay.

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Posted

Yes, perhaps. I am including a link below which explains how spousal support works. Good luck.

If you found this answer helpful, let me know by clicking the "Mark as Helpful" button or "Best Answer" at the bottom of this answer. By answering this question, the Law Offices of Cathleen E. Norton does not intend to form an attorney-client relationship with the asking party. The answers posted on this website should not be construed as legal advice. The Law Offices of Cathleen E. Norton does not make any representations about your family law matter, but rather, seeks to provide general information to the public about family-law related matters. You should consult with an attorney to discuss the specific facts of your case. Thank you.

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