If my daughter is pregnant . do i have to continue to pay child support

Asked almost 4 years ago - Tampa, FL

i pay child support for my dghtr but she is now getting welfea and medicaid and she is pregant do i have to continue to pay child support and she drop out from school also

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Joy Anne Bartmon

    Contributor Level 8

    Answered . Yes, you still have to comply with the current court order for child support. However, the law allows the court to take into consideration a minor's separate income. So, if she is receiving money from the state, it could be relevant to modify your child support which would have to be done by modifying the current court order. The fact of her pregnancy might increase her financial needs though and you might find yourself having to pay more child support rather than less. Medicaid is not income to her but it is a benefit that reduces her out of pocket living expenses and thus it could be relevant to child support reduction. If health insurance for her was part of your child support payment, then the substitution of Medicaid might decrease the child support calculation. Usually I see the receipt of Medicaid increasing the support obligation, not decreasing it. I would have to guess that she is getting Medicaid because she does not have private insurance. The State might seek to recoup the cost of the Medicaid from you as a part of child support. If she has reached the age of 18, and not in school working realistically toward a high school graduation, then child support should end. If she is still a minor and at least 16, you might consider speaking to an attorney about emancipation. It might be a good choice for her and her child overall, if it would make her eligible for more benefits. Emancipation would end your child support obligation. Some might think it less than moral to end child support so that she can get more welfare, but I do not think so. If she could get more benefits by being emancipated than the child support is worth, then it should be a consideration for her overall best interest. Please note that this answer is not intended to create an attorney client relationship and is limited to the facts presented.

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