If I've been granted asylum 2 months ago,is it too soon to request a travel document to leave the US for a short trip?

Asked over 1 year ago - New York, NY

I've been granted asylum two months ago. I have an urgent trip for work which requires I travel outside of the US for a period of 2 weeks. Is there a risk in issuing a travel document so soon? Will I face any problems in returning back to the US? Will my asylum status be affected by my request to travel soon after my asylum had been granted? How long does it take to issue a travel document?

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Marc Damien Sean Taylor

    Contributor Level 16

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You really should speak to your attorney, if you had one. Traveling outside the US, will not affect your asylum status, provided that you do not return to your homeland.

    It is always recommended that you apply for Advance Parole well in advance of your trip. All applications are done on a case by case basis....although usually it's between 90-120 days after filing. You can always try to request Expedited processing, but having to travel for work does not seem to qualify. USCIS website has information about this.

    Law Office of Marc Taylor, Esq. PC, www.usavisanow.com, 888-645-6272, info@usavisanow.com , 224 W. 4th Street,... more
  2. Daniel Patrick Hanlon

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Please consult with an immigration attorney for more information.

  3. Stephen D. Berman

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You are welcome to request a travel document and to travel, as long as you do not return to your country from which you claimed asylum. It takes about 90 days to get a refugee travel document.

    The above is intended only as general information, and does not constitute legal advice. You must speak with an... more

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