If i receive a large sum due to a work injury while filing bankruptcy does it get taken to pay creditors?

Asked 11 months ago - Whittier, CA

I filed bankruptcy in Ca & i have my court date Sept and my discharge is in November however i would receive monies some time in Oct.

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Rex Tran

    Contributor Level 10

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . My colleagues are correct. Your work injury case was an asset when you filed your case. It sounds like you just filed the bankruptcy. You still have time to amend the petition to add the work injury claim and attempt to exempt it. You should contact the attorney you filed the bankruptcy with to help you in the aspect. If you do not have an attorney, I would highly recommend that yo sit down with one to make sure that your assets can be exempted. I do not know how much you are receiving from the claim, but if it is a very large amount, one option is to let the bankruptcy case get dismissed and pay off your debts.

    Again, I think the best thing for you to do is to sit down with an attorney and explore your options.

  2. Steven Keith Brumer

    Pro

    Contributor Level 9

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You were required to list the pending court case on your bankruptcy petition. If you attended your meeting of creditors you should have been asked if you listed all of your assets on your petition. Pending claim for personal injury (called a "cause of action") is an asset of your bankrutpcy estate. Whether the proceeds will be taken to pay your creditors depends on whether you can exempt it after you have filed the required amendment to list it. You should speak to an attorney as soon as possible. Failure to list all of your assets on your bankrutpcy petitoin can result in the denial of your discharge and/or a criminal proceeding against you.

    If you found this answer helpful, please let me know by clicking the "Mark as Helpful" button or "Best Answer" at... more
  3. Dwayne M Farnsworth

    Contributor Level 14

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If your injury was prepetition, then the claim that you have to receive payment in the future was an asset that needed to be disclosed on your bankruptcy paperwork. If the payment that you're going to receive is a Workmen's Compensation claim, then it's important that you take advantage of any exemptions that may be available in your state for protecting Workmen's Compensation claims. If you're right to receive payment is something other than Workmen's Compensation, I recommend that you meet with your attorney, or if you are not represented, that you meet with an attorney immediately, even before your meeting of creditors, to ascertain what your rights and responsibilities would be with regard to this injury claim. Do not wait another day to set up an appointment to meet with an experienced consumer bank's attorney. Good luck!

  4. Ray Choudhry

    Contributor Level 14

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . It doesn't matter when you filed, it was your right to receive work comp on the date you filed that counts.
    Most states have exemptions for work comp.
    Some states like Illinois have a 100% exemption.
    You need to check with California counsel as to exemption you are entitled to.

  5. Asaph O. Abrams

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . Pursuant to periodic adjustments, both primary and secondary bankruptcy sources are often not updated with regard to bankruptcy exemption values. For instance, the cited CA personal bodily injury bankruptcy exemption allowance (mentioned in one of the comments) is not up-to-date. Different bankruptcy exemptions may be applicable to any particular asset. Disclose, amend and exempt prior to the chapter 7 bankruptcy meeting of creditors. The bankruptcy filer eligible for California bankruptcy exemptions benefits from fairly generous allowances, but their application isn't straightforward. For (as of now) current discussion of bankruptcy exemption highlights see my chapter 7 bankruptcy page and bankruptcy blog.

    This answer (by San Diego bankruptcy attorney, Asaph Abrams) doesn’t address all facts & implications of the... more

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