IF I AM IN ANOTHER COUNTRY HOW SHOULD I NOTARIZE THE COURT DOCUMENTS?

Asked over 1 year ago - Ocala, FL

I would like to fill out some type of forms, but the forms required notarization, how should i do it, (if i need to do so) if i am living in another country, and case is pending in US. I would like to fill out the forms and send them to US court.

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Joseph Knape

    Pro

    Contributor Level 9

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    Answered . I would recommend contacting the U.S. Embassy in your country. You can also reach out to the Clerk in the Court where you are planning on filing the documents to determine if they will accept an alternative to notarization. Many financial institutions offer services to verify the signature is the true identity of the person signing which is the basic equivalent to notarization. I can look into this further as I may have a similar situation involving property transfer on the horizon. If you would like to contact me by email to discuss further I am available for a free consultation.

  2. Michael Richard Jackson

    Contributor Level 8

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    Answered . While the other attorneys offer good advice in terms of seeking out the U.S. Embassy, there is a much simpler approach perhaps available to you. Since you are posting your question from Ocala, Florida, I am surmising that your case may be venued in Florida. If so, section 92.525 of the Florida Statutes applies, which provides an alternative to a verification. Specifically, you must include in the document the following written declaration: “Under penalties of perjury, I declare that I have read the foregoing [document] and that the facts stated in it are true,” followed by your signature, except when a verification on information or belief is permitted by law, in which case the words “to the best of my knowledge and belief” may be added. The written declaration shall be printed or typed at the end of or immediately below the document being verified and above the signature of the person making the declaration. Keep in mind that a person who knowingly makes a false declaration under this subsection is guilty of the crime of perjury by false written declaration, a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084.

    This answer is strictly for informational purposes, and not to be considered legal advice.
  3. Marshall C Deason Jr.

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . The US embassy or any US consulate in your country can act as the official taking the acknowledgment.

    Disclaimer: This answer is provided for informational purposes only, does not constitute legal advice, and does... more
  4. Luca Cristiano Maria Melchionna

    Contributor Level 16

    Answered . Unless this other country has a set of rules allowing for notarization in a foreign country (something very common, so they will provide you translation service and notarization), the best is to contact a local attorney conversant in English and explaining your needs. Also asking to the local US Consulate could be another good option. Best and good luck

    This reply is offered for educational purpose only. You should seek the advice of an attorney. The response given... more
  5. Todd Matthew Heine

    Contributor Level 13

    Answered . Embassy or consulate

    Total Mobility Law is an international law firm that lets companies do global business with the knowledge and... more

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