Skip to main content

If George Zimmerman called you would you represent him?

Winter Springs, FL |
Attorney answers 7

Posted

Seriously this isn't the place for this but to answer your question I would have to say yes. Everyone is entitled to an attorney even people like you.

Asker

Posted

When you say people like me you mean?

Harry Edward Hudson Jr

Harry Edward Hudson Jr

Posted

Absolutely the best answer.

Posted

Yes. Everyone needs their rights protected. This case is a tragedy, and I feel horrible for Trayvon Martin's family. But this is America where you are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

http://www.defendme.net | The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Florida. Responses are based solely on Florida law unless stated otherwise.

Asker

Posted

I am not the orginal asker but I have a question. Why is that if it is a "defense' case, everyone has no problem "defending" them no matter what kind of scums they may be (murderers, molesters etc), but why do the private lawyers don't feel the same about the victim? Some attorneys (I'm in California) actually try to take an advantage of the victim in bad vulnerable situation. Why do attorneys feel all defendants deserve lawyers but not the victim who needs the help most?

Asker

Posted

And if the "defense" lawyer win, in the case where the defendant (civil or criminal cases) is innocent victim, he/she loses because defense lawyers can earn them NOTHING.

James Regan

James Regan

Posted

Assuming criminal charges are filed, in a criminal trial if he was found not guilty, it the jury who makes the decision, unless dismissed by the Judge after a motion to dismiss. I would not represent him in a civil matter. I suspect a wrongful death case would be successful. So, in summary, I suspect that Mr. Zimmerman could be exonerated criminally, just as much as I suspect Mr. Zimmerman would be found negligent in the context of wrongful death suit. Thank You, JR

James Regan

James Regan

Posted

I am a former Florida prosecutor. If a person wears a hood in Florida, and they commit a crime it elevates the degree of feloniousness. I was also conferred a LL.M in Intercultural Human Rights. Our beloved countrymen need to stop judging people collectively and individual persons negatively because they don't anything about their race/creed/gender/religion/culture.

Asker

Posted

What does wearing a hood have to do with anything?

James Regan

James Regan

Posted

That was in response to your comment that the media was treating the decedent like a criminal. Unfortunately no matter what your assimilation/culturization/discrimination is, people who hide their faces wearing a hood is suspicious.

Posted

It would cost him too much because it's going to be a circus. Maybe some benefactor will come to his aid....

Harry Edward Hudson Jr

Harry Edward Hudson Jr

Posted

nd you would turn down all of that free , INTERNATIONAL, advertising.

Posted

At the risk of being provocative, my answer would be "yes". The problem is that no one was there who is alive to tell us what happened. Mr. Martin is gone and can not be brought back to life. That is the tragedy. Do we do another tragedy by improperly convicting Zimmerman in the Court of public opinion?
Remember the Duke LaCross team? Or that young guy at the Atlanta Olympics? Or how many prisoners are released when DNA evidence is evaluated? We just had a fellow released after 19 years or so, and that was after a full trial.

I will tell you who I would not be willing to represent--the Sanford Police Department!

I hope you found this response to be of assistance. This response shall not be considered the rendering of legal advise but instead a general response to a general question. While Avvo is a wonderful resource, nothing can be a substitute for an in-depth consultation with an attorney in the jurisdiction in which the law is to be applied. This response shall not be deemed to create an attorney-client relationship, nor shall it create an obligation on the part of the attorney to respond to further inquiry from the questioner.

Asker

Posted

What is wrong with the Sanford Police Department?

Jeffrey B. Lampert

Jeffrey B. Lampert

Posted

The SPD officers were willing to accept Zimmerman's version of events without conducting a full investigation. Look at all the information that has come out since that awful day, how close a scrutiny the 911 tapes have gotten and still no one knows for sure what occurred. Yet the police made a snap decision that Zimmerman had not violated the law. A little quick to make that call, don't you agree?

Jeffrey B. Lampert

Jeffrey B. Lampert

Posted

The SPD officers were willing to accept Zimmerman's version of events without conducting a full investigation. Look at all the information that has come out since that awful day, how close a scrutiny the 911 tapes have gotten and still no one knows for sure what occurred. Yet the police made a snap decision that Zimmerman had not violated the law. A little quick to make that call, don't you agree?

Asker

Posted

He looked pretty beat up so it was probably self defense.

Posted

Good question. I assert my rights under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution on the grounds that my answer may tend to incriminate me.

Posted

It hardly seems proper to discuss a specific case or any particular person. In general, however, I would certainly talk to anyone charged with an highly unpopular crime just as I would to any other potential client, with a view towards accepting the case if the client and I were able to work together. That having been said, I would have a major problem representing a client who talks about a case in public or posts about it online. My firm orders would be to discuss the case with absolutely nobody, and I would withdraw as counsel if those instructions were disregarded. A client who wants to go public can do it on somebody else's watch, not on mine.

James Regan

James Regan

Posted

Great response.

Posted

Every person in this country is entitled to his day in court and is innocent until proven guilty. We must look at all the facts and circumstances before we rush to judgment. There may be a legitimate defense that Mr. Zimmerman may be able to assert which is applicable to all the citizens of Florida.

Criminal defense topics

Recommended articles about Criminal defense

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer