If a living spouse grants Power of Attorney to someone else does the decedents assets still have to go through probate?

Asked over 1 year ago - Columbia, SC

Mother is wanting to grant power of attorney to me since father passed away. Would father's assets still have to go through probate now or when mother passes away?

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Brian Mitchell Mekdsy

    Pro

    Contributor Level 11

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . It depends on how your father's assets were titled when he passed away.

    If any of his assets (such as a home and bank accounts) were titled in both his and your mother's names, as joint tenants with right of survivorship, then those assets will pass directly to your mother without the need for probate. Similarly, if he had any life insurance policies/IRA or 401(k) accounts with named beneficiaries, those proceeds should be distributed directly to those beneficiaries without the need for probate.

    The POA that you will have over your mother's property will only be in effect while she is alive, and will expire automatically upon her death. At that point, when a probate estate is opened, the person appointed executor (or personal representative) is the person tasked with distributing the her property according to either her will or state law.

    When she passes, any assets she owns in her own name, including anything that she held jointly with your father, will be distributed according to her will (assuming she has one). If she does not have a will, her probate estate will be distributed according to the laws of the state in which she resided. In any event, her estate (and your father's estate, for that matter) would be administered by a personal representative appointed by the probate court.

    I strongly suggest that your mother hire an estate planning/probate attorney to make sure that any estate documents and powers of attorney she is considering executing accurately reflect her wishes.

    Hope this helps.

    This answer is in response to a general legal question and is intended for informational purposes only. It does... more
  2. James P. Frederick

    Contributor Level 20

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Your situation is not entirely clear, because you have not included much information. Your "father's assets" either need to be probated NOW, or they will never need to be probated. If everything he owned was joint with his wife or named her beneficiary, then it now all belongs to her. That is the most common way for married people to hold title. If that was the case, then no probate will ever be needed for your father. Your mother DOES need to make sure that HER estate planning is in order, so you can avoid probate upon HER death. A POA is a good start, but more will be needed, depending on the assets and your mother's objectives.

    James Frederick

    ***Please be sure to mark if you find the answer "helpful" or a "best" answer. Thank you! I hope this helps. ******... more
  3. Joseph Franklin Pippen Jr.

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Yes-because they would be in deceased person's name.
    POA's are void upon death and cannot be assigned.

    The answer given does not imply that an attorney-client relationship has been established and your best course of... more

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