I would like to be a non-resident unclamied property finder for California. Is it legal to contact California residents?

Asked over 1 year ago - Chicago, IL

I would like to be a non-resident unclaimed property finder (investigator) for California residents. I would charge a fee to help residents claim their property or cash. Is it legal to make initial contact with California residents to help them claim their property with the state? Can this be a profitable business although people can claim property for free? Do unclaimed property finders make a decent living doing this in the US?

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Bruce E. Burdick

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Be careful. This may subject you to jurisdiction in California. Expect to get sued in California if you do this and to have that enforced against you in IL.

    I am not your lawyer and you are not my client. Free advice here is without recourse and any reliance thereupon is... more
  2. Matthew Joseph Kading

    Contributor Level 7

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . My colleague is right--contacting California residents from Illinois for the purposes of "helping them claim unclaimed property for a fee" would subject you to the jurisdiction of California state (and Federal District) courts. Your contact with residents of California would, and no pun intended here, amount to "sufficient minimum contacts" with the state of California and giving rise to personal jurisdiction over you in a California court. I think, however, the placement of this question in the "Intellectual Property" category was an oversight--you're obviously not helping people find their lost patents, ┬ęs , or TMs....Simply tangible personal property and cash, correct? If so, you may find more meaningful responses in another category on AVVO.

    Regards,

    Matt
    Matthew J. Kading
    Alchemy IP Law Group
    mjk@alchemistlaw.com

    This answer is made available by the out-of-state lawyer ("Matthew J Kading") for educational purposes only. By... more
One or more answers have been taken down.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

22,851 answers this week

2,728 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

22,851 answers this week

2,728 attorneys answering