Skip to main content

I was recently arrested for shoplifted with a friend we were charged together not seperatley and we were not read our mirranda

Temple, TX |
Filed under: Criminal defense

we were charged together she had stuff and I did too i never touched her stuff and she never touched mine.

Attorney Answers 4

Posted

Your Miranda rights only have to be read to you if the police want to question you while you are in custody. Contrary to what you see on TV, suspects are not Mirandized upon arrest.

Mark as helpful

3 lawyers agree

Posted

Generally speaking If a person is not being interrogated then Miranda right not required. Contact a local criminal attorney to investigate the facts of your arrest & to assist you with your case.

This is not intended to be legal advise or as legal representation. I am a California personal injury attorney . Be aware that every state has its own statute of limitations; and statutes & case laws that govern the handling of these matters.

Mark as helpful

3 lawyers agree

Posted

Under the law of parties you can both be charged for the full amount of the items you both stole because this was one criminal enterprise. It really doesn't matter that you weren't Mirandized. This only becomes relevant if the state tries to use statements you made against you at trial if those statements were made after you were taken into custody.

Macy Jaggers's answer to a legal question on Avvo does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Ms. Jaggers offers everyone a free consultation to discuss their case. Feel free to call her office at 214-365-9800 to make an appointment (phones are answered 24 hours) or visit her website at www.macyjaggers.com for more information about her services and recent victories.

Mark as helpful

4 lawyers agree

Posted

The State may charge you for the total amount that was taken. They may also decide to charge you for what you had and charge your friend for what they had. Miranda usually means little unless you answered questions asked of you by the police. I am not sure what your question was, but it appears the state, thus far, has not over-reached its authority. An attorney would have access to the case and would be in a better position to find out what you are really charged with.

Mark as helpful

2 lawyers agree

Criminal defense topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics