I was bitten by a Rottwiler while riding the elevator of my building

Asked 10 months ago - New York, NY

Yesterday I was riding the elevator of my building with a neighbor of mine who was dog sitting for a friend of hers, At the end of the ride, I turned towards the door and the dog abrubtly jumbed to my stomach biting me very quickly. She pulled him back, but he had already punctured my skin. I walked to the entrance of the building, to meet my wife, where I saw the dog try to jump on two passer bys. Afterwards, I went to my neighbors door and asked her to find from her friend his vaccination records. I also filed a dog bite report with 311 NYC health dept but I was told I need to give them the info for the owner which I did not have; I only told them the first name and address of my neighbor. I subsequently saw my doctor for a tetanus and he subscribed antibiotics. What should I do?

Attorney answers (11)

  1. Gregory Scott Gennarelli

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    Answered . You did the right thing reporting the incident and and seeking medical care. If you have scarring, you may have a claim against the dog owner and building if the dog has vicious propensities, meaning there are prior incidents of that dog biting, acting aggressively or causing injury.

    New York Plaintiff's Personal Injury Attorney Serving NYC, Long Island, Westchester and the surrounding areas.... more
  2. Craig A. Post

    Contributor Level 16

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    Answered . As Mr. Gennarelli indicates, you may have a valid claim if you can prove the vicious propensities of the animal. Continue to get the medical care you need and consult with an attorney as soon as possible.

    Disclaimer- The information you obtain at our web-site or through postings on such sites as this is not, nor is it... more
  3. Steven Miller

    Contributor Level 10

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    Answered . See an attorney. If the dog exhibited prior evidence of vicious propensities , and your injuries warrant it, you may have a meritorious claim.

    This answer is not intended as legal advice, nor as a substitute for legal advice received from an attorney during... more
  4. Michael J Palumbo

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    Answered . Get the records and owner's name and report it. You can also call the ASPCA.

  5. Eric Edward Rothstein

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . If the elevator has surveillance ask the building to save it. In order to sue you need to show that the owner and/or building knew the dog had vicious propensities. If you have injuries worth pursuing your lawyer will want to have an investigator get sworn statements from people in the building about the dog.

    I am a former federal and State prosecutor and have been doing criminal defense work for over 16 years. I was... more
  6. Andrew Lawrence Weitz

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    Answered . While you mention she pulled him back, you don't say whether the dog was on a leash. If so, was she holding the leash before the attack? There are other ways than showing a prior dog bite to prove vicious propensity. I accomplished this once by noticing in photos of the scene that a couple of spindles were missing from the staircase. When pressed at the EBT, the owner testified that the dog had been tied up there regularly and that when the doorbell would ring the dog would bark, growl and strain at the tether. The dog was admittedly tied up for the safety of visitors and, thus, there was notice of the dog’s vicious propensity.

    The opinions expressed in this answer are not intended to be taken as legal advice. These opinions are based on... more
  7. Richard A. Grimm

    Contributor Level 3

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    Answered . Making a report with the proper authorities is the proper start. You need to determine the name of the dog's owner. The fact that you know the address is a great start. It shouldn't take much to get the owner's name. An attorney should be able to obtain this information. You or your attorney may also need to engage an investigator to investigate the dog's history of prior bites or other "vicious propensities". The fact that the dog apparently lunged at others in your presence wouldn't establish PRIOR vicious propensities, but it might be a good indication of the dog's general disposition. Hopefully your bites heal quickly and without complications.

    Please note that it may be difficult to get a complete understanding of a legal matter based on a question... more
  8. Merry Melinda Fountain

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    Contributor Level 15

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    Answered . If you have any ongoing medical issues, such as scarring, then you should contact a New York personal injury attorney. Many are listed on the Find a Lawyer section of this web site, and most initial consultations are free. I practice in Indiana, however Attorney Gennarelli has advised you that in New York the dog would need to have bitten someone else first. This could be investigated by a personal injury attorney if you have ongoing medical issues. Was happy to hear that you filed the bite report, and saw your doctor for a tetanus shot.

    Merry Fountain is licensed to practice law in Indiana. She can be contacted at 1-888-242-HURT. This is not legal... more
  9. David Ian Schoen

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . Consult with a NY personal injury lawyer.

  10. Alan James Brinkmeier

    Contributor Level 20

    3

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    Answered . Make a demand that the owner pay for your dog bite damages.

  11. Christian K. Lassen II

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . Ask the doorman or management office for the person's name

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