I was asked to perform duties that constitute fraud. I strongly stated I would not commit fraud.

Asked over 3 years ago - Carlsbad, NM

After making it clear I would not commit fraud my office chair was replaced with a cushioned folding chair. My case load was changed and I was moved to another office in another town. This added additional 3 hours of travel time to go to the office. I have been allowed to work from home but when I expressed a need for supplies I was told where I could buy them. The changes that were made increased the hours I needed to work to get things in on time. I am not paid overtime and it was impossible to complete the task in a 40 hour week especially with the increased travel time.I was pressured to get things in on time. The stressed caused a relapse of a medical condition. I took FMLA for 4 weeks and was replaced.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Pamela Koslyn

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . This sounds like a pretty good retaliation case, where you were punished for refusing to do something fraudulent.

    See an employment litigator to disclose and discuss exactly what you were asked to do, and how your employment conditions changed as a result of your refusal. Prepare a chronological log, with names, date, witnesses, etc. of everything you experienced and witnessed from te time you were hired til the time you were fired.

    Disclaimer: I'm only licensed in CA. Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice, and should not be relied on, since each state has different laws, each situation is fact specific, and it is impossible to evaluate a legal problem without a comprehensive consultation and review of all the facts and documents at issue. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship.

  2. Amina Renee Merritt

    Contributor Level 6

    Answered . This questions raises a lot of other questions. Depending on the type of fraud involved, you may be protected by whistleblower laws. I would definitely consult an attorney to discuss the details. Many employment laws involve timelines, so you should consult an attorney as soon as possible.

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