I recently asked the question If a probation officer can call up a casino and get information on my play status or play history

Asked 10 months ago - Sacramento, CA

All the answers I got back were YES he and yes I have no rights.. but when I asked the supervisor if this is true.. She laughed and said no way in hell could they give out any information about anything on one of there players unless they had warrant or subpoena. so I'm just curious was i just getting answers from UN experienced lawyers . or were they just answering just to answer.. it really bothers me that i come to this forum for advice and ask for help from professionals and get the wrong advice

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Greg Thomas Hill

    Contributor Level 20

    7

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . When you asked the casino owner, did you ask as someone who was concerned about your playing history? Or did you ask as an investigator? The casino is in the business of making money. The supervisor will say exactly what you want to hear and then show you to a table to start gambling.

    Mr. Phillips' answer hits the nail on the head.

  2. John M. Kaman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    7

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If a bunch of lawyers told you yes but a casino owner said no why would you believe the owner over the lawyers and assume they all have no experience?

    Because I was recently congratulated by an Avvo questioner for having the courage not to use a disclaimer, let me... more
  3. Michael Stewart Phillips

    Contributor Level 14

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . The casino could voluntarily disclose your information to your P.O., but they could not be FORCED to do so without a warrant or subpoena. I bet an imaginary penny that my investigator could get your gambling history and status without a warrant or subpoena.

    Your P.O. can legally bust into your HOME and shake you down 24/7. Maybe your P.O. is intentionally leading you to believe she is less able to monitor your behavior than she actually is to keep you off guard.

    I think you got correct advice.

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