Skip to main content

I need to contest my Aunt's will who passed away last month. I was told by my Aunt in 2007 that my Dad and me were in her will.

Austin, TX |

In 2010 the executor of the will, my cousin said there was lotsa of money for my Dad and me, even though he passed away in Nov. 2009. When my Aunt died, my cousin didn't even call to let me know that she died. Now she says that there is nothing in my Aunt's will/estate, should I contest this will? One problem, the will has been filed in a Surrogate Indian Court with all her family members working at the court. What can I do?

Attorney Answers 2


  1. I am somewhat confused by your inquiry, as there are really two different issues mentioned. First, you mention that you were supposed to be named under the will. You never mention that you ultimately were not named in the will that was probated. Have you seen a copy of the will that was probated? If you believed you were to be named but you weren't, and you were close to your aunt and believe she had intended to provide for you in the will, then you may have a reason to challenge the will. You will have to prove that your aunt was unduly influenced in executing the will that was admitted to probate, which is a difficult argument to prove.

    Secondly, you mention that your cousin ultimately stated that there was no money or assets in your aunt's estate. Your aunt could have had a sizeable fortune; however, if all of her accounts were "payable on death" or "beneficiary designated," then those accounts would be distributable to the named beneficiaries on each of those accounts/assets, regardless of her will provisions. If this was the case and you were not a named beneficiary on one of those accounts, you may not inherit anything from your aunt's estate.

    If you still have questions regarding your options at this time, I recommend you contact a probate attorney in your area to discuss your rights.

    The comment provided above is intended as general information and IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation. If your question concerns an Estate Planning, Elder Law, or Long Term Care Planning matter governed by the laws of the State of North Carolina, please contact me for personalized service. fourpillars@fourpillarslawfirm.com (910) 762-1577.


  2. First, request a copy of the will from the courthouse. Also request any other documentation, especially an inventory filed with the court. Second, you need to find an estates attorney in IA to assist in determining whether you have any rights to pursue and if so to bring a challange to the currently probated will. Be aware that these type of will contests are hard to win and the burden of proof is on you to prove your case. Get with an estates litigation attorney in IA to know conclusively where you stand. No one at this forum can give you that answer since the facts and evidence have to be reviewed in a face to face meeting to determine your chances.

    Hope this helps. If you think this post was helpful, please check the thumbs up (helpful) tab below and/or designate my answer as best answer. Thanks.
    Mr. Fromm is licensed to practice law throughout the state of PA with offices in Philadelphia and Montgomery Counties. He is authorized to handle IRS matters throughout the United States. His phone number is 215-735-2336 or his email address is sjfpc@comcast.net . For further tax advice check out his website is www.sjfpc.com . and his blog is >

    LEGAL DISCLAIMER Mr. Fromm is licensed to practice law throughout the state of PA with offices in Philadelphia and Montgomery Counties. He is authorized to handle IRS matters throughout the United States. His phone number is 215-735-2336 or his email address is sjfpc@comcast.net , his website is www.sjfpc.com. and his blog is <http://frommtaxes.wordpress.com/> Mr. Fromm is ethically required to state that the response herein is not legal advice and does not create an attorney/ client relationship. Also, there are no recognized legal specialties under Pennsylvania law. Any references to a trust, estate or tax lawyer refer only to the fact that Mr. Fromm limits his practice to these areas of the law. These responses are only in the form of legal education and are intended to only provide general information about the matter within the question. Oftentimes the question does not include significant and important facts and timelines that if known could significantly change the reply or make such reply unsuitable. Mr. Fromm strongly advises the questioner to confer with an attorney in their state in order to ensure proper advice is received. By using this site you understand and agree that there is no attorney client relationship or confidentiality between you and the attorney responding. This site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney that practices in the subject area in your jurisdiction, who is familiar with your specific facts and all of the circumstances and with whom you have an attorney client relationship. The law changes frequently and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The information and materials provided are general in nature, and may not apply to a specific factual or legal circumstance described in the question or omitted from the question. Circular 230 Disclaimer - Any information in this comment may not be used to eliminate or reduce penalties by the IRS or any other governmental agency.

Tax law topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics