Skip to main content

I need an immigration attorney advice.

Reading, PA |

I'm from Belarus and I have a political asylum case in NY. Now i'm in process of changing venue to PA. But on the first hearing I want to change my political case to a marriage. My fiancé is from Texas and one of his offices is in Texas, and one in Philadelphia. He can't change his permanent address to PA cause of business reason. Recently I'd start working for the same company. So we travel together and both don't have a permanent address to live in. Is it going to create a lot of problem cause it is not a "classic marriage case"?

Attorney Answers 6

Posted

It is doable, but you will be highly scrutinized. I strongly urge you to retain an immigration attorney right away. You have a lot going on here and you need to speak to an attorney regarding your particular situation and the options available to you. Just because you moved, does not mean that the Judge will automatically agree to transfer your case to PA. Good Luck.

The answers offered here are purely informational and do not create an attorney-client relationship. For more detailed information or to schedule a consultation please contact our office at (718) 924-2896.

Mark as helpful

1 found this helpful

8 lawyers agree

3 comments

Asker

Posted

Hi, Alice Thank you for the respond. Don't get me wrong I have an attorney in Philadelphia transferring my case here. But she said it's going to create a lot of problem on the interview if I have my case in Philadelphia and i'm a resident of Philadelphia but he's resident of Texas and he pays taxes there as well. He works for the big company and has offices there and here like I said before. I don't think this is an impossible case. I just want to know alternative opinion. She said the immigration will accuse me in fraud.

Alice Antonovsky

Alice Antonovsky

Posted

I do not think they will automatically accuse you of fraud. However, since i am not familiar with he details of your case, I cannot give you legal advice. If you are doubting the advice of your attorney, maybe you should think about getting a second opinion. However, the only way to get valuable advice is to have your entire case reviewed by an attorney. Good luck.

Alice Antonovsky

Alice Antonovsky

Posted

I do not think they will automatically accuse you of fraud. However, since i am not familiar with he details of your case, I cannot give you legal advice. If you are doubting the advice of your attorney, maybe you should think about getting a second opinion. However, the only way to get valuable advice is to have your entire case reviewed by an attorney. Good luck.

Posted

It's definitely more of a challenge to establish that you have a good faith marriage when you don't live with your spouse full-time after the marriage. But it's not impossible, if you have a reasonable and believable explanation for why you need to maintain separate addresses. I would strongly recommend that you and your fiance retain a good immigration lawyer to help you with this case. Not only do you have the issue of your separate residences to deal with, when you try to get a green card based on a marriage you enter into while in removal proceedings you face a higher standard of proof. This is not the sort of case you want to pursue without professional help.

Christina Murdoch
Attorney
Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C.
105 W. Madison St., Suite 2200
Chicago, IL 60602
(312) 444-1940
(312) 444-1950 (fax)
cmurdoch@lawfirm1.com
www.lawfirm1.com
"Like" us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/sdpollock
Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sdpollock

Please visit our renovated website at www.lawfirm1.com, which allows client access to case status, enhanced information on services, and other convenient features.

Mark as helpful

1 found this helpful

8 lawyers agree

Posted

Sounds like a "commuter marriage." Not traditional and yes, more questions and documents will be needed to further solidify your case before the immigration judge and government attorney/prosecutor called "Assistant Chief Counsel" in quizzing you two at the trial (merit) hearing on why you have this unorthodox arrangement but its "doable' like the other colleague pointed out just need to have competent counsel to help you navigate the case.

Mark as helpful

1 found this helpful

5 lawyers agree

Posted

You don't need advice, you need to actually hire an attorney. What you are discussing you may be able to be accomplish but it will be extremely difficult and nearly impossible without an attorney. My firm handles such cases.
Regards,
Nicklaus Misiti
Law Offices of Nicklaus Misiti
212 537 4407

Legal disclaimer: The statement above is general in nature, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.

Mark as helpful

8 lawyers agree

Posted

it may or may not. you will have a Stokes interview

This is not legal advice and a client attorney relationship is not created. For a free consultation call (718)234-5588.

Mark as helpful

6 lawyers agree

Posted

The best way to get immigration attorney advice is to hire one. There are many very good immigration attorneys in Philadelphia and New York.

The answer provided here is general in nature and does not take into account other factors that may need to be reviewed for a more precise answer. You should consult with an immigration attorney before taking any action. The answer here is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship.

Mark as helpful

6 lawyers agree

Immigration topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics