I need advice for winning an appeal against a claim that I quit my job for personal reasons.

Asked almost 2 years ago - Jacksonville, FL

I had worked at my employer for 11 years when a new supervisor was brought in. I had applied for the job but was passed over and accepted that and was willing to work with the new supervisor. However, over the ensuing 4 months she made life unbearable for me, making me work extremely long hours (I was salaried exempt), called me at home with work questions until 10 o'clock at night, kept questioning my sanity and suggested I needed counseling and even wanted to see my health records (she's not a doctor and we didn't work in the health field). She would berate me for 1-2 hours every evening behind closed doors before allowing me to leave for the day. It got to the point I couldn't sleep or eat at all and my clinical depression was made exponentially worse which caused my work to suffer.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Eric J Trabin

    Contributor Level 19

    Answered . The first thing you should do is hire an attorney who handles these types of appeals. Unemployment appeals can be very technical and there are rules of evidence that apply and if you don't know them then you can't make the proper objections. That being said, the question is did you quit? If you quit, then you will have to convince the referee that this wasn't a voluntary self-termination but rather there was a hostile work environment and you were forced out. People choosing to be unemployed won't get unemployment benefits, so you want to prove that this wasn't your choice but the will of the employer.

    This is not to be considered legal advice nor does an attorney-client relationship exist.
  2. Scott M. Behren

    Contributor Level 14

    Answered . When you quit, it is certainly more difficult to obtain unemployment benefits, but it is possible that you could convince unemployment to pay benefits here. Feel free to contact my office if you wish further assistance. www.behrenlaw.com or www.takethisjobnshoveitblog.com. Also you may want to discuss whether your position was truly salary exempt or not.

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