I'm unemplyed, I can't afford my rent, I'm two months behind, how do I or can I get out of my lease? I'm in the state of MO

Asked over 5 years ago - Jefferson City, MO

I lost my job in February. In march I told the lanlord I couldn't afford it. He said keep paying until I can find somone to rent the apartment, probably by may. I can't afford to keep paying and I'm falling behind in rent payments, (Two months i owe.). Yesterday he called and said if I pay the last two months, he can probably get somone in there in July. 1) if i could keep paying I would 2) the fact that he wants me to pay the two months so he can rent it out in july feels like he doesn't believe I can't pay it and he trying to see if I am lying. I don't know what to do.

Additional information

Sorry for little information. When I told the landlord I could not afford the place anymore, I stopped living there. I gave them my new number to contact me. I however never recieved what staement or letter in the mail saying I had missed a payment or and eviction notice. I often call my landlord and leave messages but 7 out of 10 times, he never returns the calls. He told me recently if I payed the last twom months rent he could move someone in there by July. I have given them an intent to vacate the resadence and the lanlord knows I haven't been living there. I felt if I couldn't afford it I shouldn't live there. I have been staying with a friend the last few months searching for work.
In the lease there is no clause for what would happen if something medically happen to you and you couldn't work nor is their anything in the contract that specifies what would happen if you lost a job and couldn't work no more.

Attorney answers (1)

  1. John G. Gromowsky

    Contributor Level 11

    Answered . Your question does not provide enough details to answer it accurately. However, in general the terms for terminating your lease may be stated in your lease agreement. If you no longer have a copy, then request a copy from your landlord. As a person who is occupying a rental property without paying rent, you may be subject to a rent and possession action in civil court. This is a type of lawsuit in which the landlord files a complaint seeking a judgment for monetary damages in the amount owed in back rent and for possession of the property (i.e., eviction). The longer you live in the property without paying the rent, the greater the potential damages award against you.

    Because the resolution of your problem will largely depend upon facts not mentioned in your question, you should seek the assistance of a local attorney if you cannot resolve the problem amicably with your landlord. Good luck.

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