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I'm facing eviction

Freehold, NJ |

I'm currently facing eviction out of my home. I have a court hearing this Friday. When I moved into my apartment I just started a new job and was able to afford rent and everything else, and after a couple of weeks they lowered my pay a lot and that's when trouble came now they let me go last week. Is there anything I can do to stop/prolong the eviction?

Attorney Answers 4


  1. If you have other financial problems, you might consider filing a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy to stop the eviction, but that will only be temporary, not permanent. You need to consult an attorney right away and discuss your specific situation with the attorney.

    Leonard R. Boyer, Esq. 201-.675-.5577. If you found this Answer helpful, please mark it as "Best Answer" Please be advised that the answer above is only general in nature cannot be construed as legal advice, given that not enough facts are known. It is your responsibility to retain a lawyer to analyze the facts specific to your particular situation in order to give you specific advice. Specific answers will require cognizance of all pertinent facts about your case. Any answers offered on Avvo are of a general nature only, and are not meant to create an attorney-client relationship.


  2. First, you must ask yourself if you can presently afford to live in this property. If you cannot, then I suggest that you start looking for a temporary place to land until you get back on your feet financially. It pains me to say this, but you describe a situation where the landlord needs to get the property paying again. Maybe you can come to some terms with the landlord to post pone eviction if you pay a certain amount now. If not, then you need to come up with a plan B real soon. I am afraid that filing for bankruptcy might be too rushed and forcing the matter a little strong. I recommend that you get in touch with a NJ bankruptcy attorney first thing Monday morning. Good Luck!


  3. Other than a bankruptcy, which is really no solution under the circumstances, you have 2 choices: either you obtain a roommate, or you negotiate with your LL an early termination of the lease to minimize your penalties. If you do get evicted, you might be able to convince a judge to give you an extended time to move out in an orderly fashion. Even so, you're still obligated to continue paying rent.

    Your landlord's not at fault here; your finances changed. The LL is entitled to the rent you agreed to pay in your lease.

    The foregoing is not legal advice, and nothing in the foregoing shall be deemed to create an attorney client relationship. If you feel you need to speak with an attorney regarding your issue, it is recommended that you contact an attorney with expertise in your area of inquiry. The information related above is purely for informational purposes, and should not be acted upon without speaking with qualified counsel familiar with you specific situation and the laws related thereto.


  4. You could retain counsel, but that's going to cost more money you don't have. In the end, you should find a place you can afford - or someone with whom to share expenses. Good luck.

    I may be guessing or not licensed in your state. No atty/client relationship exists. I earn my living collecting points for "helpful" answers.

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