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I have reason to believe that my home health aid is taking bribes from people to check on whether I qualify for health coverage

New York, NY |

I questioned her a few times about this and she acted very suspicious and refused to answer yes, or no. Obviously if she did nothing wrong, she'd immediately deny it. I want to report her to her agency with my suspicions but in order for me to do this do I need to provide hard evidence? (Like saying that there was a witness to this...)

I'm not out to get her fired; rather I'm trying to find out which people in my building are at the root of this. (I do genuinely qualify for since I am home bound now.)

Attorney Answers 2


  1. You don't explain what the basis for your suspicion about your home health aid is other than evasiveness when questioned. I imagine something must have triggered your suspicion to begin with before you questioned her. You are free to complain to her agency with or without evidence, but how seriously they take you will largely depend on how credible your evidence is.


  2. You haven't asked any question. Obviously, you will not endear yourself to the worker or agency if you make allegations against her, especially if she did nothing wrong.

    Lawrence Friedman, Bridgewater, NJ. Certified as an Elder Law Attorney by the ABA approved National Elder Law Foundation, former Chair NJ State Bar Association Elder and Disabilities Law Section, Member Board of Consultors of NJSBA Real Property, Trusts & Estates Law Section, Vice Chair Special Needs Law Section of National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, and Master of Laws (LL.M.) in Taxation from N.Y.U. School of Law. Visit SpecialNeedsNJ.com for articles and Q&A on elder law, special needs, wills, trusts, estates, and tax. Visit SpecialNeedsNJ.com/blog and subscribe for free timely updates to be delivered to your inbox. Information on both Avvo and SpecialNeedsNJ.com does not constitute legal advice, as it is general in nature and may not apply to your situation or be subject to important changes. No attorney client relationship exists unless set forth in written engagement terms.

    Lawrence Friedman, Bridgewater, NJ. Certified as an Elder Law Attorney by the ABA approved National Elder Law Foundation, former Chair NJ State Bar Association Elder and Disabilities Law Section, Member Board of Consultors of NJSBA Real Property, Trusts & Estates Law Section, Vice Chair Special Needs Law Section of National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, and Master of Laws (LL.M.) in Taxation from N.Y.U. School of Law. Visit SpecialNeedsNJ.com for articles and Q&A on elder law, special needs, wills, trusts, estates, and tax. Visit SpecialNeedsNJ.com/blog and subscribe for free timely updates to be delivered to your inbox. Information on both Avvo and SpecialNeedsNJ.com does not constitute legal advice, as it is general in nature and may not apply to your situation or be subject to important changes. No attorney client relationship exists unless set forth in written engagement terms.