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I have a rental in the City of Seattle & want to serve termination of tenancy on renters.

Seattle, WA |

The rental agreement is a month to month, and has both the husband and the wife on it. I intend to serve a notice of term of tenancy with cause. Do I need to create 2 separate documents? One for husband and one for wife and have them served & mailed separately, or can I use one notice? Thank you!

Are you saying one document with both names? And serving the original and a copy of the same document? Or am I separating them with one name on different documents.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

It is wise to serve the document on each of them. This could included substitute service - ie.. giving 2 notices to one spouse. Also mail one to each spouse. Review RCW 59.18.040.

From Justcause.org:

SMC 22.206.160(c): Duties of owners – just cause eviction
Seattle Landlord-Tenant Laws
The Just Cause Eviction Ordinance (JCEO) was passed in Seattle as a result of the work of Seattle renters and the Tenants Union of Washington. JCEO requires that Seattle landlords have just cause reasons to terminate tenancy or evict month-to-month or other periodic tenants (tenants who pay rent weekly or twice a month). There are 18 total just causes listed in the ordinance – many more than there were in the past. Just causes for eviction include rent nonpayment, noncompliance with lease terms, chronically late rent payments, and the intention of the landlord to occupy the unit themselves or rent the unit to an immediate family member. The notice required for each just cause reason varies. Outside of city limits, there is no just cause protection for tenants, and landlords can ask tenants who are not on a term lease to vacate with only 20 days’ written notice.

The landlord cannot use just cause termination in retaliation for tenants asserting their rights under landlord-tenant law or calling in complaints with code enforcement. Seattle tenants experiencing retaliation can contact the Department of Planning and Development (DPD) at 206.615.0808. This does not include tenants on leases, whose tenancy ends when the lease ends, unless otherwise stated in the lease. Seek legal assistance as soon as possible if you are facing eviction in the City of Seattle. If you have defenses in an eviction lawsuit, you may be able to secure an attorney to represent you in court. Tenants facing eviction in Seattle can contact Catholic Community Center's Legal Action Center or the King County Bar Association’s Housing Justice Project.

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Posted

Both names on all notices. Serve at least two copies at (or on) the door AND mail at least two copies, preferably in separate envelopes.

If you fail to serve enough copies your case may be thrown out in court.

Pitfalls like that are why it is best to hire an attorney if the notice does not do the trick.

This answer is based on limited information provided and is not a substitute for legal advise. No attorney-client relationship is created. To protect your interests it is best to seek a private consultation with an attorney.

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Posted

thankfully for all of you I served two notices personally by a server & mailed 2 copies. Thanks

Posted

I agree with the previous answers all names on the pleadings and serve two copies.
Good Luck

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