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I got this back from the bankruptcy court does it mean all debts on my petition will be discharged? Is it all clear for dischg?

Miami, FL |

Heres a copy of the letter (summerized)

The information required by 11 U.S.C. §521(a)(1) as provided by the debtor* in this case is complete
to the satisfaction of the trustee and no creditor or other party in interest has filed a request for an order of
dismissal pursuant to 11 U.S.C. §521(i)(2) as provided under Local Rule 1017−2(A)(2). Based upon the
trustee's review, the court has determined that the debtor has complied with the information requirements
of 11 U.S.C. §521(a)(1).

Accordingly its

1. case not subject to automatic dismissal

2, If an interested party wishes to object they have 21 days and must serve all parties to the case

3. Any party that does not file within 21 days waives the right

4. nothing in the order shall excuse the debtor from cooperating

Attorney Answers 3


The notice is a standard one that is issued by the trustee followed by the order. It's not your discharge. It's merely a step in the right direction.

None of this response should be taken as legal advice as there is not enough information available to give legal advice. nor is this an appropriate forum to provide confidential legal advice. The answer provided is only intended to alleviate some of your fears so you can sleep and move forward.

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That is not your discharge, no. It will be clear; reference Section 727 Orr 1328.

This answer should not be construed to establish an attorney-client relationship. Please consult a licensed attorney in your state and visit or for more details.

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This is a court administrative notation. It has little meaning for you & it is not your bankruptcy discharge.

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