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I created a document using a fake signature of a city employee and sent it to a client in order to buy time on a project

Chicago, IL |

correct documents were sent in and no money was lost to client.. Client must have told the city about the letter and they sent it to the inspector general inspector wants to meet to discuss...i did d no intent to defraud client or city, i was just late in filing documents, the project closed out with no issues...should I talk to lawyer first.? I understand where it can go if they choose

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Attorney answers 7

Posted

Yes, you should speak with a lawyer first. Do not meet with anyone until you do and refrain from any further discussion here or in any other public forum or from any conversation except with your lawyer.

Posted

You absolutely need to speak through an attorney.

The common sense notion of "no harm - no foul" does not apply to forging a signature of a city employee.

By the way, you did intend to defraud in order to buy time.

The above is general legal and business analysis. It is not "legal advice" but analysis, and different lawyers may analyse this matter differently, especially if there are additional facts not reflected in the question. I am not your attorney until retained by a written retainer agreement signed by both of us. I am only licensed in California. See also avvo.com terms and conditions item 9, incorporated as if it was reprinted here.

Joshua Sachs

Joshua Sachs

Posted

I agree with Mr. Doland. Your own description of your conduct appears to fall squarely within the usual definitions of intent to defraud, and you can only claim otherwise because you do not understand the law or the meaning of the words that you use. You also do not understand that you have posted a confession on the internet.

Alexander M. Ivakhnenko

Alexander M. Ivakhnenko

Posted

I completely agree with my colleagues: even if no harm has ensued as a result, that does not erase the presence of requisite criminal element of intent.

Posted

Don't post anything else online about this. You have already admitted too much. Don't speak to anyone else except the lawyer that you retain to assist you in this mess. I think you really need a criminal lawyer at this point. It is beyond a business issue. I will re-post it.

The content of the this submission is intended to provide general information on the topic presented, and is offered with the understanding that the author is not rendering any legal or professional services or advice. This submission is not a substitute for legal advice. Should you require such services, retain competent legal counsel.

Posted

You need counsel for two reasons. One, a case can be made that you did mean to defraud when you improperly affixed an official's signature. Two, to explain to you why when your fact pattern is somewhat unique, posting admissions online may lead to an Alexander day*.

* a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day.

Posted

Yes you absolutely need to speak to a lawyer before you go anywhere the inspector general. You have a serious criminal exposure to potential state and federal charges. You have also made a terrible mistake by discussing the facts of your case in a public internet forum. Never do that again. What you say to an attorney is strictly confidential. What you post on the internet, including on Avvo, is published to the entire world, including the inspector general and the United States Attorney, either of whom would be delighted to discover your posting.

Posted

Perjury and document felony charges are very likely.

DISCLAIMER The answer given above by the lawyer serves for educational purposes only and provides general information and a basic understanding of the applicable law. Take notice that the answer above does not create an attorney-client relationship as this website is not intended to provide anyone a specific legal advice. Anyone using the site expressly consents that there is no attorney client privilege between any person and any attorney responding. Further take notice that the site should not be used as a crude substitute for any professional and competent legal advice by a licensed professional attorney in the applicable jurisdiction. The attorney above attempted to provide competent professional opinion, however, the law and its applications may change frequently and vary greatly from other U.S. jurisdictions and locales. Therefore, any information and opinions stated above are general in nature, and may not apply to specific factual or legal circumstances related to one's current legal issues. Contact an experienced lawyer admitted to practice in your State under an attorney-client privilege to further receive a comprehensive legal before making an educated decision about your particular legal issue. Respectfully, Attorney Alexander Ivakhnenko, Chicago, Illinois

Posted

Delete this question from this forum, if possible, and talk to an attorney in person.

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