I am USC- filing for a mother who overstayed visitors visa. Do I need to included I-485A and pay the penalty?

Asked over 1 year ago - Philadelphia, PA

Also, part b of I-485- is it option A (an immigrant petition giving me an immediate ..visa..)?

Attorney answers (6)

  1. Christopher Michael Casazza

    Contributor Level 10

    7

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No, an i485A is not required. The 484A is used in limited circumstances. If your mother lawfully entered on a visitor's visa, her overstay is waived because she is an immediate relative. I suggest you contact an experienced immigration attorney for more information.

  2. Stephen D. Berman

    Contributor Level 20

    7

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No.

    The above is intended only as general information, and does not constitute legal advice. You must speak with an... more
  3. Irene Vaisman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . I-485A is for something else
    she is an immediate relative

    This is not legal advice and a client attorney relationship is not created. For a free consultation call (718)234-5588.
  4. Bindi Chintan Parikh

    Contributor Level 11

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No.

  5. F. J. Capriotti III

    Contributor Level 20

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . NO ... that form isn't needed.

    YES ... you should consult with an attorney. As you can see, this isn't a simple matter of filing in some forms.

    PROFESSOR OF IMMIGRATION LAW for over 10 years -- This blog posting is offered for informational purposes only. It... more
  6. Karen-Lee Pollak

    Contributor Level 19

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Consult an attorney. You may be causing your mother more harm than good.

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