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I am pro se and with no money.Can I find a lawyer to file my appeal in this employment case On a contingency or pro bono basis?

Bowie, MD |

I filed an employment discrimination case in 2009 with the EEOC that after 2 years of investigation ruled my favor.However,having picked the wrong lawyers not experienced in employment law,the judge thrown my case out after I waited 5 years and without a day in a Court.
I am not pro se, and I need to a lawyer help me file my appeal on a contingency or pro bono basis.

Attorney Answers 4

Posted

Try the Avvo 'find a lawyer' tab.
You will have to reach out to lawyers directly.

FWIW, yours are unlikely to find an attorney wiling to donate thousands of dollars to you for no particular reason.

NOT LEGAL ADVICE. FOR EDUCATION AND INFORMATION ONLY. DO NOT RELY ON ANY ADVICE YOU RECEIVE FROM ME OR ANY OTHER ATTORNEY IN THIS FORUM. Legal advice comes after a complete review of the facts and relevant documents and an expressed (written) agreement of representation that forms attorney-client confidentiality. Neither of these two events can occur in this forum. Mr. Rafter is licensed to practice in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the US Federal Courts in Virginia. His answers to any Avvo question are rooted in general legal principles--NOT your specific state laws. There is no implied or actual attorney-client relationship arising from this education exchange. You should speak with an attorney licensed in your state, to whom you have provided all the facts before you take steps that may impact your legal rights. Mr. Rafter is under no obligation to answer subsequent emails or phone calls related to this or any other matter.

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Asker

Posted

Thanm you

Posted

Try Avvo's "find-a-lawyer" feature. If you have a favorable EEOC ruling, you may well be able to find a contingency fee arrangement, because in general a prevailing plaintiff in a discrimination case is entitled to fee-shifting, i.e. the judgment typically may include an award for reasonable attorneys fees to be paid by the defendant to plaintiff's attorney.

On the other hand, based on the facts presented, your claim may be time-barred. I suggest you consult with an attorney experienced with discrimination law and appellate work. Good luck.

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Asker

Posted

Thank you counselor. But what do mean by time barred? Indeed the judge issued his decision on 01/06/2014.

Jonathan R. Miller

Jonathan R. Miller

Posted

"Time-barred" is lawyerese and means that something was filed after the deadline for doing so. For example if you file a lawsuit after the statute of limitations has expired, your claim would be time-barred. I do not know the facts of your case, of course, and offer no opinion as to the viability of your claims or your appeal. You need a lawyer. Posting questions on Avvo is no substitute.

Asker

Posted

Thank you,got you.

Posted

"Pro bono" is a fancy Latin word that basically means "charity". Replace the term with "charity" in your mind and you will have a better understanding of how to proceed. How would you go about getting anyone who works for a living to treat you as a charity case?

The usual answer is that you need to contact an organization such as Maryland Legal Aid which is funded through donations and grants, an organization like a law school legal clinic which provides charity assistance in order to help law students learn how to handle cases, or Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service where working lawyers volunteer their time when they want to perform public service and can afford to devote time without pay. Outside of the time many of us devote to these types of organizations and the free advice provided in forums such as Avvo, most attorneys simply cannot afford to take on complex cases for clients who won't pay us - although if you have an extremely high profile case that will create a lot of publicity for you and your attorney, that might also provide a reason for a working attorney to agree to represent you for free.

The success rate on appeal is extremely low even for very good appellate attorneys and strong cases. Many mistakes cannot be fixed on appeal. Most mistakes made by your attorney cannot be fixed on appeal. Generally, only mistakes made by the judge can be fixed on appeal. You cannot present new evidence and are limited in your ability to make new arguments that were not presented to the trial court. Appeals are very time consuming and obtaining transcripts and court records is expensive.

It is very unlikely that you will find an attorney who will handle your appeal on contingency. You will have a very difficult time convincing a lawyer who works for a living and needs to make money to care for his or her own family that it makes sense to invest that much time and money into a case in exchange for a very very small chance to get a share of what you might receive a couple of years from now if you are successful.

You can reach Colorado Legal Solutions by phone or email. Stephen Harkess is an attorney licensed in the state and federal courts of Colorado. This answer is for general information only and does not create an attorney client relationship between Stephen Harkess or Colorado Legal Solutions and any person. Sometimes free advice is only worth as much as you paid for it. You should schedule a consultation with an attorney to discuss the specifics of your legal issues.

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Posted

Avvo has plenty of contingency fee lawyers, and attorneys fees may be awarded. Avvo has a terrific "find a lawyer" tool to locate a top-rated Avvo attorney with a low contingency fee.

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