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I am international student going to the U.S. for graduate studies. Will I be referred to secondary inspection or denied entry?

Edwardsville, IL |

I was an exchange student in 2011-2012 academic year. I left the U.S. for winter break and I came back to U.S. in January 2012 for spring semester. I successfully completed my program, and a year later I decided to continue my studies and get a Master's degree. When I applied for F1 visa the Visa Officer sent me to admin. processing because he found some mistake in my previous SEVIS record. I got my F1 visa eventually, but now I am worried that I might get in trouble at U.S. border. as I understand, currently all international students face increased scrutiny at U.S. POEs after Boston incident. Will I face problems despite that I obtained new visa and the consul confirmed my admissibility? I never violated my student status, when I traveled I got necessary validation.

Attorney Answers 5


  1. Best answer

    Since you were cleared for a second F-1 visa by the U.S. Consular Officer and were issued a valid F-1 visa you met all the requirements and were approved. Therefore, you should not come under a close scrutiny at the POE UNLESS you create additional level of concern like travelling with a pressure cooker to the United States or something that may create a legitimate reason to investigate.

    DISCLAIMER The answer given above by the lawyer serves for educational purposes only and provides general information and a basic understanding of the applicable law. Take notice that the answer above does not create an attorney-client relationship as this website is not intended to provide anyone a specific legal advice. Anyone using the site expressly consents that there is no attorney client privilege between any person and any attorney responding. Further take notice that the site should not be used as a crude substitute for any professional and competent legal advice by a licensed professional attorney in the applicable jurisdiction. The attorney above attempted to provide competent professional information, however, the law and its applications may change frequently and vary greatly from other U.S. jurisdictions and locales. Therefore, any information and materials provided above are general in nature, and may not apply to specific factual and legal circumstances related to one's personal legal issues. Contact an experienced lawyer admitted to practice in your State under an attorney-client privilege to further receive a competent legal advice before making any important decisions about your particular legal issue. For further inquiries please contact: Attorney Alexander Ivakhnenko 1021 West Adams, 102, Chicago, Illinois 60607 773-562-8602 http://alexanderivakhnenko.com


  2. This appears to be more of an immigration question. I have changed your practice area to attract the immigration attorneys for more answers.


  3. I don't see any reason why you would have problems entering the US.

    (213) 394-4554 x0 Mr. Shusterman is a former INS Trial Attorney (1976-82) with over 35 years of immigration experience. His response to your question is general in nature, as not all the facts are known to him. You should retain an attorney experienced in immigration law to review all the facts in your case in order to receive advice specific to your case. Mr. Shusterman's statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.


  4. Most likely you should be fine.

    This advice does not form an attorney-client relationship and is merely informative. It should not by itself be relied upon to address a legal concern.


  5. If you got your F1 and you have a valid passport, school paperwork, etc, then I do not see why you would have any problem from Customs and Border Protection.

    However, if there are other possible immigration issues that you did not mention here, you might be in for enhanced scrutiny. Other circumstances that could lead to enhanced scrutiny include: international events that lead to heightened scrutiny to all visitors, or to visitors form your country; having a name similar to some terrorist or international criminal; being on a flight that gets picked for enhanced scrutiny due to something entirely unrelated to you, and the list goes on....

    Law Office of Mary K. Neal | www.immigratechicago.com | info@rogersparklaw.com| 773-681-1335 This answer is intended as public information about a legal topic. Answers posted here do not create an attorney-client relationship. For specific legal advice, please make an appointment to speak with an attorney in private.

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