I am green card holder and how can i safely leave to stay abroad for a period of time and come back to USA for naturalization.

Asked about 1 year ago - Jersey City, NJ

Me n My husband both are green card holders. Received in Feb 2012. Till now I waited to work here in USA and now when I wanted to work my husband is forcibly taking me to Dubai because he got a dream job offer there. He said we would make a re-entry permit through attorney and leave. I even gave him an option that if we wait for 3+ more years we’ll get citizenship. Want to know what are my rights as green card holder and how can I prevent him from taking me + my son of 4.5 years old to Dubai. I would always want to come back to US to get my citizenship if I go to Dubai. I also fear that he might take me there n divorce me since we are not gettin along well for quite some time now. Don't know rules of UAE. What are the options for me n my son to be secure? Make an agreement with him?

Attorney answers (7)

  1. John Grayson Davidson

    Pro

    Contributor Level 17

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Most of this is not an immigration question. I'm not even sure it's a family law question. If you're not getting along, you need to do some soul searching to weigh the risks of going. If you're worried about his keeping your child, you do need a family lawyer. The laws in Dubai do not favor women.

    Free Consultation Anywhere in USA | 626-399-4194 |ICannHelpYouNow.com | John1Davidson@gmail.com
  2. Husna F. Alikhan

    Contributor Level 14

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You used the term "forcibly" You have many options here in the USA as a female ie. women's shelters; protective orders; etc. You should really consult with a experienced family law attorney in your State.

    Husna Alikhan, Esq., www.alikhanlaw.com TEL: 702-374-6619. Nothing in this response to your posting on AVVO is... more
  3. Eric M. Mark

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . A reentry permit would allow you to reenter within two years of leaving, but not more. It also would delay you citizenship eligibility by the length of time you spend overseas. It is probably worth consulting with an immigration lawyer and a family lawyer given your concerns and the importance of those concerns.

  4. Madhu Kalra

    Contributor Level 14

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . I agree with my colleague that you seek consultation with a family law attorney and explore your options regarding forcibly going to Dubai along with your son. It appears to be more domesic law issue than immigration law issue.

    Madhu Kalra Kalra Law Firm 23720 Arlington Avenue, Ste 5 Torrance, Ca 90501 (310) 325-9012 http://www.... more
  5. J Charles Ferrari

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . To become a US citizen, you must live the majority of the time in the US. Being absent from the US for a year or more, will require that you be back in the US for at least four years and one day before you can apply for citizenship.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not... more
  6. Marc Damien Sean Taylor

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . I agree with my colleagues.

    Unfortunately, there are no easy answers but you should make a decision before you leave the US. Especially, if things are not going well in your marriage.

    As my colleague said, maybe speaking to a family law, if you want to see what your options are in terms of divorce or custody.

    Law Office of Marc Taylor, Esq. PC, www.usavisanow.com, 888-645-6272, info@usavisanow.com , 224 W. 4th Street,... more
  7. Yolanda Navarrete

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . I agree that leaving the US more than one year is a risk. You do not have to go. You may file for support from your husband. If becoming a citizen is important to you, do not leave.

    973-984-0800. Please be advised my answers to questions does not constitute legal advice and you should not rely... more

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

32,459 answers this week

3,364 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

32,459 answers this week

3,364 attorneys answering