I am being sued can they go after my inheritance

A man I hired to work at a farm that I myself was employee by is suing the owners of the farm after he and all other employees were let go and was never paid the wages I told him the job would be paying. The owners of the farm have slapped a law suit on me saying that if they lose in court then they will go after me for any money they lost. Is this legal? Can they also go after my inheritance?

Gillette, WY -

Attorney Answers (3)

Kelly Scott Davis

Kelly Scott Davis

Elder Law Attorney - Cheyenne, WY
Answered

Is it legal that they can sue you? Yes. Will they win? Probably if you don't hire your own attorney.

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Robert V Cornish Jr.

Robert V Cornish Jr.

Litigation Lawyer - Washington, DC
Answered

More facts are needed to provide guidance to you in this matter. But generally, if there's a reason to attach assets (including an inheritance) pre-judgment that a court deems worthy of such action, then yes, your inheritance could be at risk. A settlement agreement may also provide for some mechanism to obtain part of your inheritance.

You will need an attorney to discuss your defenses to the suit and other steps to be taken to protect your interests - and you need such a person immediately. There are many good attorneys here on AVVO, and the Wyoming Bar Association has a great referral service.

Regards,

Bob

The foregoing is not legal advice nor is it in any manner whatsoever meant to create or impute an attorney/client... more
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Charles Michael Tobin

Charles Michael Tobin

Lawsuit / Dispute Attorney - Silver Spring, MD
Answered

Your employer may sue you. However, it seems unlikely that you would be held liable. I can only guess that your employer is saying that you promised more than they authorized you to promise and that you exceeded your authority. I have no idea what you promised, but as I understand it, your employer failed to pay the other employees. Certainly, they were entitled to be paid. Having paid nothing, it is hard to conceive that your employer can establish that you overpromised. Moreover, unless your employer has named you as a third party defendant in the pending case, it may be difficult when they lose to file a new suit against you. This is the kind of case where all the claims should be heard at the same time. Courts do no favor a multiplicity of suits over the same facts and legal questions between parties that should have been joined in the original suit.

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