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I am a US citizen and my wife is a permanent resident. Is there any way we can bring her mother to the US?

Atlanta, GA |

My mother-in-law is in very bad and rapidly deteriorating health, and she is having extreme difficulty taking care of herself. She is in Poland now. My wife and I cannot meet our debt obligations and support my mother-in-law if we moved to Poland. Therefore, we are trying to figure out a way to bring my mother-in-law to the U.S. She is 75 years old and disabled.

I am a U.S. citizen, but my wife just became a permanent resident six months ago. Is there any way that we can bring my mother-in-law to live with us in the United States so that we can take care of her (without having the $500K for an entrepreneurial visa)?

I cannot find any options, but I am not an expert. Please let me know if you have any suggestions.

I really appreciate the answer that was already given. Just to clarify, we would like to bring my mother-in-law to the U.S. permanently, and we would need her to have a status that allows us to purchase health insurance for her.

Attorney Answers 4


  1. Your mother in law could come to the US on a visitor visa and then sometime after arrival your wife could file an I-130 for her mother to become a permanent resident. Consulting with an immigration attorney id s good idea. There are many in the Atlanta area.

    The answer provided here is general in nature and does not take into account other factors that may need to be reviewed for a more precise answer. You should consult with an immigration attorney before taking any action. The answer here is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship.


  2. Tough scenario if your wife is not yet a citizen. BTW, you don't need $500K for an entrepreneurial visa. You can get an E-2 for Polish citizens for much lower than $500K (ex: $60k has been approved for Polish business). Thus, provided your mother-in-law is at all entrepreneurial/ managerial and has about $60-100K in cash to open a US business, that might be a way. Humanitarian parole might also be another option but it is not long-term (might be granted solely for the duration of her medical emergency). I would suggest consulting a lawyer since the viability of these options is fact-specific.

    Contact: 860-548-2629 or dbucin@uks.com. This answer is provided for general education purposes only and is not intended to provide, nor does it provide, any legal advice.   By viewing this answer you understand and expressly agree that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the attorney who authored the answer.  Should you need legal advice, please contact a licensed attorney who practices in this area.  Readers of this answer and the information contained herein should not act upon any information contained in this answer without seeking legal counsel.


  3. I agree with my colleagues.

    (213) 394-4554 x0 Mr. Shusterman is a former INS Trial Attorney (1976-82) with over 35 years of immigration experience. His response to your question is general in nature, as not all the facts are known to him. You should retain an attorney experienced in immigration law to review all the facts in your case in order to receive advice specific to your case. Mr. Shusterman's statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.


  4. Yes, when the wife becomes a citizen.

    NYC EXPERIENCED IMMIGRATION ATTORNEYS www.myattorneyusa.com; email: info@myattorneyusa.com; Phone: (866) 456-­8654; Fax: 212-964-0440; Cell: 212-202-0325. The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter.

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