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I am a US Citizen and I married and petitioned this guy (a nurse)..Why is there no protection for US citizen from fraud?

San Diego, CA |
Filed under: Divorce Green cards

I got pregnant and I petitioned my husband as a fiance and married him. (he's a nurse)..I did all the paperworks. I see red flags here and there, but I was just blinded by my love for him. As soon as he got his permanent 10 year green card, he started treating me worse verbally and emotionally abusing me, withholding sex, affection, humiliating me, criticizing me. You see I am a very good wife, I graduated as a doctor, I am not fat, just gullible with love. He told me to my face while we were having sex, he wanted to be single and he wanted to have sex with other girls. He also told me he thinks of girls as clothes, just change. Later, I found out he was cheating, and he told me he never loved me from the beginning. Can I file for one-sided fraud?

Attorney Answers 5

Posted

I'm sorry you find yourself in this unfortunate situation. Unfortunately, it sounds more like you fell in love with someone who became a jerk and not necessarily someone who married you to get a green card. At this point, since he has his 10-year green card, the best thing might be to try to move on. If you think you've been defrauded, you can certainly report this to the government and they will decide whether to investigate further.

The information offered is general in nature and not meant to be relied upon as legal advice. Please consult an attorney prior to making legal decisions. Visit us at www.tunitskylaw.com. Contact us at 713.335.5505 or email at veronica@tunitskylaw.com. Veronica Tunitsky offers in-person, as well as telephone and email consultations.

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Posted

He was a jerk to start with, I just thought he loves me. I held on for my son, and for my love for him. He is an emotional manipulator and used women to get what he wanted in life: money and a greencard. There's a lot of protection for aliens from abuse, but none for US citizen who have been subjected to this abuse. I should lobby a law about this, making it harder for these love fraud. Even the smartest of women fall for this!

Posted

It will be very hard to prove , am afraid. All DHS departments are literally deluged with calls and letters from disgruntled spouses but pay very little attention to them due to lack of resources and manpower.

Also, based on your story, your husband did not really violate any immigration laws when he married you and filed for a GC. It was all in "good faith", he will argue, but that later "events" took over and...

Behar Intl. Counsel 619.234.5962 Kindly be advised that the answer above is only general in nature cannot be construed as legal advice, given that not enough facts are known. It is your responsibility to retain a lawyer to analyze the facts specific to your particular situation in order to give you specific advice. Specific answers will require cognizance of all pertinent facts about your case. Any answers offered on Avvo are of a general nature only, and are not meant to create an attorney-client relationship.

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Posted

So to marry without love from the beginning was not fraud? I should have recorded what he said that he never loved me from the beginning and can't I tell the signs from the start. I really don't want to be vindictive and I am moving on, but there ought to be a change of policies protecting the US citizen more from these scammers. The heartaches, financial, psychological, and emotional consequences of this love fraud is devastating to a person. FYI, these bad treatments did not start after, I said it got worse... He was never home, he gambled all the time, gambled all our money away, sent me for 8 months to our country so he said I could study for my boards...I just didn't leave cause as soon as I did, he would come running after me and tell me he loves me (this is before the greencard). After the permanent green card, there goes the wanting to live like a bachelor. Some people are just con artists, we just don't view this as a crime, but it should be. Since yes, I have no physical proof.

Giacomo Jacques Behar

Giacomo Jacques Behar

Posted

At least you got rid of him now, BEFORE he could have inflicted more damage.. Believe me, if that's his character he will never, ever be happy. What he did to you, others will do (much worse) to him. Trust me, what goes around, comes around... Get on with your life, you are still young, a Doctor in the U.S. - just stay away from guys from your own country.. (Is it the Philippines?)

Asker

Posted

Well, I got my degree in the Philippines as a doctor, haven't passed my board because of all these problems, got him settled here first (even tutored him on his NCLEX he can't understand), and I am currently working here at big hospital as a clinical documentation specialist so to support us as he gambled all our money. I had a lawyer ex-boyfriend here in the US, he went to Loyola Marymount, he was a nice guy, we were together for 6 years (but since med school-the long distance was hard), so I had this notion of being very trusting of guys because I had a great ex-bf. Alas, lesson learned in life, as nobody taught this relationship 101 in school...lolz That was such nice words for you to say...you are right karma is a b*tch! Lolz, how do you know I am young? Yeah you are so right it is a character flaw, he always projected his unhappiness to me.

Giacomo Jacques Behar

Giacomo Jacques Behar

Posted

Don't worry, I know more than you think.. You'll become happy again, just stay away from creatures such as that one.. There so are many nice Doctors around.. even at the hospital where you are.. Keep your eyes (and ears) open at the cafeteria.

Posted

I agree with my colleague. Also, sounds like you may want to consult with a divorce attorney. Good luck to you.

This is not legal advice and a client attorney relationship is not created. For a free consultation call (718)234-5588.

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Posted

I'm sorry you had to go through this unfortunate situation. You can definitely report him to immigration if you believe he committed marriage fraud, but you might open yourself up to scrutiny if you ever decide to sponsor a future spouse for a green card again. I agree with my colleague that the best thing to do might be to move on with your life and try to find happiness elsewhere. Good luck.

www.gassonlaw.com - Disclaimer: This a general answer to your legal question. Unless you have a signed engagement letter with me, you should not consider this information to be legal advice.

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Posted

Thanks Kristina.... All the red flags lit up after I have separated myself from this person. I was blinded and enmeshed in this love trance he has for me and the want of keeping my family together for my son. This is why he wanted everything fast and gets mad at me if I delay his immigration process, and me wanting to please him went along like a puppy dog. And no, never again will I sponsor another opportunistic person to come in here to the US. This taught me a lesson, not to be naive with people's intentions. They only want you and "love" you because of your citizenship, not because they truly love you. The US government should have more laws about this protecting unsuspecting citizens from scammers.

Posted

I agree with my colleagues. Find a good divorce lawyer and move on. Sorry to hear about your situation. Good luck to you.

Mr. Murray's response is NOT legal advice and does NOT create an attorney-client relationship. You should NOT rely on this response. Mr. Murray's response was generated without conducting a full inquiry as would occur during a face to face attorney-client consultation. It is likely that the response above may be made less accurate, or become entirely inaccurate, as you, i.e. the questioner, disclose additional facts that should only be discussed during a private consultation with an attorney. I strongly recommend that you consult an attorney who is licensed to practice law in your state, whereupon all relevant facts will be discussed. All responses posted by Mr. Murray on Avvo.com are intended as general information for the education of the public, and not for any specific individual.

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