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I am a plaintiff in a personal injury case. I searched for a personal injury attorney on contingency basis. On more than one

Sacramento, CA |
Filed under: Personal injury

web site of personal injury firms; the firm lists a long list of cases that the firm won or were settled for tens and even hundreds of millions of dollars. Adding up these millions and given that that the attorney takes in 33.33% of which the attorney pays say two third of it in taxes and expenses to run his or her firm; the attorney is left with tens and sometimes hundreds of millions of dollars NET INCOME.

Now why would an attorney still bother practicing law and not go out there and enjoy life with money that would cover him, his family, his wife, his children, his grandchildren, and his relatives for life? I need to understand this so that when I hire a P.I. attorney on contingency basis; I know what motivates him to work hard on my case if he or she is already filthy rich.

Attorney Answers 5

Posted

There are very few attorneys who have that much money and still practice. Generally, the "worker bees" handle the day-to-day operations. On the other hand, for a solo or small firm, you may get equal or far superior quality work. My 2 cents. Meet with several attorneys and see who you like. Good luck.

The above is general information only and is not legal advice. The information provided does not form an attorney-client relationship, and should not be relied upon to take or refrain from taking any action. I am not your attorney until we sign a retainer agreement.

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Posted

Who can possibly say?

But when I am advising friends or family about choosing a lawyer I tell them to look at two things:

1. How does he present himself? Is he well spoken? Does he care? Is he intelligent? These traits all go to his ability to present your case at trial and other court proceedings.

2. How well does he write? Much of "lawyering" is in the ability to present your position in written briefs. If you can obtain a sample of his writing, this will assist your case immensely.

So stay focused. Your goal is to win. The lawyer is just there to help you do so.

This answer is for guidance only and is not intended nor does it create an attorney-client relationship.

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Posted

Why does Bill Gates still work every day? LeBron James? No idea. But many people continue to work even if they don't "need" the money. Respectfully, that should not be your focus. Your focus should be on how comfortable you are with the attorney. Does he or she respond to your inquiries? Did they present themselves well? Did they seem genuinely concerned about your case? That is what matters.

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Posted

Attorneys that work on a contingent fee don't win all of their cases. On the cases they lose, they lose the value of all of their time and the time and expense of all of their staff, in addition to the money that they invest into a case. Large personal injury cases require the investment of large sums of money for experts, investigators and various consultants in addition to court costs, fees for court reporters and videographers and others. A successful person injury lawyer makes up for the losses with client recoveries that sometimes result in big fees. Your calculation is not really resulting in the"net income' of these advertising attorneys. I think you have to judge a prospective attorney's motivation to work hard for you at a personal level. Ask that very question and judge for yourself if the answer is sincere. If the attorney doesn't have or take the time to demonstrate that he is interested in helping you, I think you will know that.

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Posted

You are free to find a new attorney who is hungry for cases.

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