Skip to main content

How will a change of residential address affect my green card renewal? I have a conditional green card that is about to expire.

Atlanta, GA |

I'm separated, moved out of the house and going through divorce, I have not signed the papers yet but I need to renew my green card within a month. Will using a different address affect my application process?

Attorney Answers 3


  1. If you filed based on a joint petition, the separation will affect your pending application in a profound way. I recommend that you consult with an immigration attorney immediately to discuss your options.


  2. You're moving away and filing for divorce will have profound Implications on how you file your form I-751 to remove conditions. Once divorced, you will be able to invoke one of the many exceptions that exist for the joint filing requirement. But can only do so once divorced. In the meantime, it's very important to file the I-751 one before Your green card expires. It is imperative that you hire a skilled immigration lawyer in your area to assist you with the process. He or she will know how to ask USC I to hold the adjudication of yourI-751 until the finalization of your divorce.

    Behar Intl. Counsel 619.234.5962 Kindly be advised that the answer above is only general in nature cannot be construed as legal advice, given that not enough facts are known. It is your responsibility to retain a lawyer to analyze the facts specific to your particular situation in order to give you specific advice. Specific answers will require cognizance of all pertinent facts about your case. Any answers offered on Avvo are of a general nature only, and are not meant to create an attorney-client relationship.


  3. Get divorced and file an I-751 waiver.

    (213) 394-4554 x0 Mr. Shusterman is a former INS Trial Attorney (1976-82) with over 35 years of immigration experience. His response to your question is general in nature, as not all the facts are known to him. You should retain an attorney experienced in immigration law to review all the facts in your case in order to receive advice specific to your case. Mr. Shusterman's statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.

Divorce topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics