HOw many day notice does a landlord have to give a tenant before eviction

Asked about 6 years ago - Burlington, WA

How many days notice does a landlord have to give a tenant before eviction

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Scott G Wolfe JR

    Contributor Level 12

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    Answered . To add to Ms. Munoz's answer, I think you have the following factors that may influence the notice requirements:

    1) Your rental agreement. In many cases, your lease with actually stipulate the type of notice required before eviction, and as a party to that contract you will be required to comply with those notice requirements.

    2) Your reason for the eviction. Is the tenant late on rent? Is the tenant in default of a certain provision of the lease? Has the rental term expired? Each of these eviction justifications may implicate eviction periods.

    3) The type of lease. Is this a commercial lease, a residential lease, a lease of a mobile home, etc? As far as notice of eviction is concerned, the law in Washington treats each of these lease types differently.

    Generally speaking, however, here is the most popular rule:

    WA RCWA 59.04.040: When a tenant fails to pay rent when the same is due, and the landlord notifies him to pay said rent or quit the premises within ten days, unless the rent is paid within said ten days, the tenancy shall be forfeited at the end of said ten days.

    Good luck.

  2. Travis Scott Eller

    Contributor Level 11

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    Answered . It depends on the reason, but generally three days for non-payment of rent, ten days for any other non-compliance with the terms of the lease, and 20 days prior to the end of a month to end a month-to-month tenancy. RCW 59.12.030.

    If there is a lease, then the lease may grant more time (but may not shorten the time).

    For free forms see my website, accessevictions.com.

  3. Sandra Dee Munoz

    Contributor Level 14

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    Answered . It depends on your local laws, plus what sort of rental agreement you have. You should be able to do an online search of landlord/tenant laws in your area, and there are usually free booklets available that will answer basic questions such as this. Good luck to you!

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