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How long does it take to transfer felony probation to a different county?

Ocala, FL |

the reason for transfer is because i'm moving. also i have not had any problems with my p.o

Attorney Answers 3


You must request a transfer from either your probation officer or from the court. If your probation officer can arrange transfer, you should ask them. If it has to be done by court order, it depends on how long it takes for the Judge's secretary to give you a court date for a motion for transfer. Depending on how crowded the Judge's docket is, you might get a hearing within 7 days after your request. You will also have to notify the state of your request for transfer court date.

The information provided is not legal advice from Criminal Defense Lawyer Albert Quirantes, or the Ticket Law Center in Miami, Florida. There is no attorney client privilege created in this communication. Do not send questions which are confidential in nature by either this venue or via email. Personal questions should be asked in person or via telephonic conference only. You should only ask theoretical questions of a general nature.

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It should not take long, but if your po cannot or will not get it done, you have to get court permission.

R. Jason de Groot, Esq. We do not have an attorney-client relationship. I am not your lawyer. The statements I make do not constitute legal advice. Any statements made by me are based upon the limited facts you have presented, and under the premise that you will consult with a local attorney. This is not an attempt to solicit business. This disclaimer is in addition to any disclaimers that this website has made. I am only licensed in Florida.

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Although s/he can be helpful, either way your PO has no say in the matter. Your lawyer must make a compelling presentation to the court, hopefully after having researched the viability of the proposed transfer.

To answer your question more directly though: It will take however long it takes for the Court to satisfy itself that the transfer is A) doable (that the receiving jurisdiction will accept the proposed transfer), B) reasonable and C) responsible.

I hope this has been helpful.

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