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How long does alcohol stay in your urine for a drug test? I pleaded guilty to a DUI and am on probation.

Canton, GA |

How long does alcohol show up in your urine system for a urine test? My probation officer called me in for a drug test screen on a urine sample. I plead guilty to DUI. I work in a restaurant that serves alcohol, which was brought out in court and deemed acceptable.

I met with my probation officer a few days after my court date, and everything seemed routine and fine. Then a week later I get called in to take a drug test.

I know they test for drugs; if they test for alcohol via the urine sample, how long after alcohol is consumed does it show up in a urine sample? This is in Cherokee County.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

Alcohol can last anywhere from 12-36 hours in your urine. Whether alcohol will show up will depend on how long before the test you drank, how much you drank and whether they are testing for EtG and EtS or just alcohol. If you had a glass of wine the night before they probably won't find anything. If, however, you were intoxicated it may show up.

Urine testing can show the presence of alcohol, but only until the alcohol is out of the blood and the bladder is emptied - 6 to 12 hours after the end of drinking in most cases. Longer if you drank a lot of alcohol. This detection time can be extended by another ten hours if they test for ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS).

There are several biochemical markers associated with significant alcohol consumption that can show up for a long time after the actual alcohol is out of the system. Generally, the tests for these markers are blood tests, not urine tests. Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) can show alcohol use for 3-4 weeks after consumption. Gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) detects chronic drinking for 2-6 weeks after the person stops drinking. A mean corpuscular volume (MCV) test can show chronic drinking for several months after stopping.

DISCLAIMER- THIS IS NOT INTENDED TO AND DOES NOT CONSTITUTE LEGAL ADVICE AND DOES NOT ESTABLISH AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP. CONSULT QUALIFIED LEGAL COUNSEL IN YOUR CITY OR STATE FOR IMMEDIATE LEGAL ADVICE.

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Posted

I can't imagine you showing up while under the influence of alcohol since consumption of alcohol while you are on probation for DUI is often a condition of probation which you would then have violated. Urine testing is seldom, if ever done for ethanol. Most likely, they will be testing for MJ. So, being made aware that random testing is upon you govern yourself accordingly. Your Local DUI lawyer shold know much more about the local PO policies. If not, find another lawyer.

I am an attorney, practicing throughout the state of Georgia, but primarily in the areas around Augusta, Statesboro and Savannah, Georgia. You may review more information about my practice by going to: http://www.avvo.com/attorneys/30809-ga-elmer-young-540135/reviews.html. The information I am providing you should only be considered for your general knowledge and educational purposes. Consider it as a good first step in your knowledge acquisition, but not as legal advice. Indeed, any information I provide is based on the extremely limited facts you have provided and new facts could substantially alter any answer or reply. My opinion should be understood to apply only to the laws of the State of Georgia. You should always consult with a local attorney about your situation if you live outside of the State of Georgia.

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Posted

Thank you Mr. Young for answering my question; no I was not under the influence post probation. Concern was the court date/conviction to the time of test was short. Thanks again.

Posted

Some urine alcohol tests can detect alcohol in the body up to 4 days after consumption.

James L. Yeargan, Jr. is licensed to practice law in the State of Georgia. All information given is based only on Georgia law, and is not directly applicable to any other jurisdictions, states, or districts. This response, or any response, is not legal advice. This response, or any response, does not create an attorney/client relationship. The response is in the form of legal education and is intended to provide general information. Any state specific concerns should be directed to an attorney who is licensed to practice law in that respective state.

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