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HOW LONG DOES A PETITIONER HAVE TO SIGN DIVORCE PAPERS IN TEXAS

Dallas, TX |

ALREADY BEEN THROUGH TEMP ORDERS. 60 DAYS BEEN UP THE RESPONDENT IS READY TO MOVE ON, PETTITIONER HOLDING IT UP.

Attorney Answers 2


  1. Unfortunately, there is no required time period to finalize the case unless the court sets the case on the dismissal docket. The 60 day waiting period after the Petition is filed is just the minimum amount of time before a divorce proceeding can be finalized, but cases are very rarely finalized in this amount of time.

    If the case is in Dallas County, the best thing to do when one party is holding up the proceedings is to request a pre-trial hearing from the Court. At the pre-trial hearing, the Court will set the case for trial and likely give the parties some deadlines they have to meet, such as a deadline to mediate the case. If the case is in another county in the DFW area that does not do pre-trial hearings, such as Collin County, you can usually call or write to the court coordinator and request a trial date. Having a firm date in place for trial tends to speed things up and gives everyone a timeline to work within.

    This information is provided solely for informational purposes and only reflects the opinions of the author. By no means is this information intended to be legal advice and you should always consult an attorney before taking any action in litigation.


  2. I agreed with the previous answer - setting the matter for trial usually puts pressure on the other side. Also, one thing to keep in mind, if the parties reached an agreement/settlment, through mediation for example, then you can file a Motion to Enter. This bascially means that the parties settled, but one side has not yet signed the order that was drafted from the settlement..

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