How hard will it be for me to complete my naturalization process abroad?

Asked over 1 year ago - College Station, TX

I am an Australian citizen, and have lived in the U.S. for around 9 years, my green card has been issued for 5 years and 20 days now. I plan on going back to Australia in 4-6 months to finish my degree, and for work opportunities, meaning I would be there for over 2 years. I would like to become a U.S. Citizen because both of my parents live here and I would like to keep my options open for when I complete my degree.
Some concerns I have:
How long does an N-400 take to process?
I understand there is fingerprinting, an interview, and an oath ceremony. If I had already left and needed to come back for these things, would they work with me? Or does it need to be done the specific date, and if so do they give notice? (Plane ticket prices could be huge)
Can any part be done in a U.S. Embassy?

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Carl Michael Shusterman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    14

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No, naturalization must all be done in the US.

    (213) 394-4554 x0 Mr. Shusterman is a former INS Trial Attorney (1976-82) with over 35 years of immigration... more
  2. Alexander Joseph Segal

    Contributor Level 20

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Who told you, you can complete your naturalization process abroad? Are you a military person in active duties deployed abroad? No. I thought so. You cannot do that abroad.

    NYC EXPERIENCED IMMIGRATION ATTORNEYS www.myattorneyusa.com; email: info@myattorneyusa.com; Phone: (866)... more
  3. Eliza Grinberg

    Contributor Level 19

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No part can be done at the consulate. You should first seek naturalization, be naturalized and then plan your travel.

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