How do I terminate the rights of my daughter's biological father in Nevada (Washoe County)?

Asked over 1 year ago - Reno, NV

My ex and I were never married and there has NEVER been a custody order in place since he lives in WA (and I in NV - our daughter was born here) and has been in and out of prison since before she was born. He has never had any physical contact with her (they sent mail for a while and monthly phone calls) and he has failed to contact her in any way for almost a year. I recently found out he is back in prison (drugs, theft and felony pursuit) and want to term his rights especially since I am married now and my husband wants to adopt her. I am almost positive my ex will not agree to this, but I'm sure I have grounds, I just don't know where to start, especially since we can't afford to hire a lawyer.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Jill K. Whitbeck

    Pro

    Contributor Level 17

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    1

    Answered . You will have a very hard time getting a termination done without an attorney. As parental rights have constitutional protection, it is not an easy process. So many unrepresented people were screwing the process up that the self-help center no longer provides forms. You may be surprised at the cost of using an attorney, especially considering that your "ex" may contest but really doesn't have much of a leg to stand on so it is really more uncontested. Once you get the termination out of the way, the adoption is pretty easy. Please call my office if you would like a consultation. The only other option would be to see if you qualify for a reduced fee or pro bono attorney through Washoe Legal Services or Nevada Legal Services.

    Responses are for general information purposes only, and are based on the extremely limited facts given. A... more
  2. Richard Edmund Hawkins

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . I agree; your chances of getting this done without an attorney are slim.

    I don't do this anymore (one of my partners does, but I"m not at the office). If memory serves, though, the general standard is two years of no contact or support, or consent with new stepparent adopting.

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