How do I properly serve a subpoena for records?

Asked 12 months ago - San Diego, CA

I am in pro per. I need to serve subpoenas on my ex's employer and bank. My ex lied on her Income & Expense Declaration & refuses to provide copies of paystubs per the FL-396 i served on her. I can articulate why I need the records to prove she is being untruthful again.
I asked the Court Clerk for two subpoenas, and they gave me a handful of SUBP-002's!
Question 1 - is this form adequate for employment and bank records? Or do I need to use a SUBP-010?
Question 2 - if this form is okay, can I have a third party serve it or does a deposition officer need to serve. (i know the response goes to the dep officer to make copies)
Question 3 - Do I need to send a SUBP-025 with it since I am asking for consumer/employ records?
Is there anything else I need to do that I am missing?? Thanks

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Christine James

    Pro

    Contributor Level 18

    2

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . You must serve a SUB-025 BEFORE you serve the form in any event. If you are in the discovery period and simply looking for "business records", serve SUB-010. If you are asking for records for trial, serve SUB-002. UNLESS the propounding party agrees to service in any other manner, the notice and subpoena must be personally served. It can be served by any third party but the proper proof of service must be prepared and signed by the serving party.

  2. Martha Bronson

    Contributor Level 14

    Answered . I agree with counsel. Best of luck.

    Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice, and should not be relied on, as each situation is... more

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