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How do i help my husband return to the US. He is a native of Guatemala. What is/How does the "forgiveness" work??

Stockton, CA |

My husband and I were married in the US while he was living here as an undocumented immigrant. We have a child. He recently returned to his native guatemala for a family emergency. He has 3 underage children from a previous relationship (he was never married). How can I help them come to the US in the quickest way possible? What is the Forgiveness program? What form is that? What do I need to prove?

Attorney Answers 4


  1. You will first have to file an immediate relative petition on his behalf. He will have to go through consular processing. He will most likely need a waiver of inadmissibility because of his previous unauthorized stay in the US. I suggest that you retain an experienced immigration attorney to help you out.
    Luis A. Guerra, Esq.
    Law Office of Luis A. Guerra, PA
    Atrium Centre
    4801 South University Dr., Suite 252
    Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328
    (954)434-5800
    www.guerralegal.com

    Law Office of Luis A. Guerra (954) 434-5800. This answer is of a general nature and should not be relied upon as final, nor is it intended as legal advice.


  2. Generally, a person who entered the country illegally and is here without proper immigration status must return to his/her home country to file an immigrant visa petition to be able to return to the United States. The problem is, once he/she leaves the country, he/she faces an automatic unlawful presence bar of inadmissibility of 3 or 10 years before they can return (3 years if he/she had been in the U.S. less than 6 months and left voluntarily, 10 years if in the U.S. more than a year).

    In the case that a 3 or 10 year bar is applicable, the immigrant may file an I-601 extreme hardship waiver to eliminate the unlawful presence bar to returning to the U.S., but the time it takes for DHS to process these petitions can take weeks, months, or even years, and the person must remain in their home country until the waiver is approved. In deciding what qualifies as extreme hardship, the DHS official will consider: 1) the presence of LPR or USC family ties to the U.S.; 2) the qualifying relative's family ties outside the U.S.; 3) the country conditions in the country of relocation and the qualifying relative's ties to that country; 4) the financial impact of departure from the U.S.; and, 5) significant health conditions, particularly when tied to unavailability of suitable medical care in the country of relocation. They may also consider factors such as the impact of separation; the economic and other conditions in the country to which she will accompany her spouse or parent; the financial, emotional, cultural, and political conditions in that country and her ability to raise children and other quality of life factors, like health and employability.

    In order to be eligible for this waiver, though, the foreign national must be an immediate relative of a U.S. Citizen (not a lawful permanent resident) and there must be extreme hardship to qualifying relatives who are U.S. Citizens if a person has to leave the country for the processing of their petition. The considerations for extreme hardship under this new announcement are the same as the I-601 extreme hardship waiver considerations.

    www.immigrate2usa.com

    Neil I Fleischer (513) 977-4209 www.immigrate2usa.com Note: Neil Fleischer is an attorney licensed in the State of Ohio The below answer is provided for informational use only. One should not act or refrain to act solely based on the information provided. No attorney/client relationship is created unless an Agreement is signed by the attorney and the client. Best regards, Neil Neil I Fleischer The Fleischer Law Firm, LLC 917 Main Street Cincinnati, Ohio 45202-1314 Direct telephone: 513 977 4209 nfleischer@immigrate2usa.com Enjoy our Blog at http://immigrate2usa.blogspot.com/


  3. You will need to petition him and he will need to obtain waivers in order to return.

    You need to retain an experienced immigration lawyer to review all the facts and advise you accordingly.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.


  4. Your husband will need a waiver in order to retunr to the US. I suggest you consult with an experienced immigrtaion attorney to determine if he will qualify.

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