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How do I find cases that are most similar to the circumstances of my situation?

Houston, TX |

I am trying to find cases in Texas that are most similar to mine--involving my father's estate with stepmother as executrix (7th wife - married in 2000). There were changes to bank accts. adding her JTWROS. He executed a will in 2007, designating bank accts. along with acct. numbers and who he wanted those particular bank accounts to go to. He developed dementia over the next few years and started adding her to accts., closing accts., opening new accts., transferring large amounts of money consisting mostly of separate property royalties, cashing CDs, selling separate property stock, selling separate property real estate, etc. Lots of liquidataing and moving around of money--uncharacteristic of him. I am trying to find similar cases, preferably successful, to read and educate myself.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

The situation that you paint is not all that uncommon. However, the facts including any medical reports on your dad will push the needle one way or the other. Being that his wife was the main recipient of his "generosity" makes proving things more difficult. Needless to say this is complicated.

If this is important to you I would suggest talking one (or several) attorneys to get their thoughts based on the facts that you have available. I would suggest finding a probate litigation attorney on this site or at naela.org.

Good Luck!

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The resolution of the issues is fact specific. If you are concerned about your rights, you need to consult an attorney.

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Go to your local law library. Look for West's Key Digest and look for your search terms. There should be similar cases listed under the same Key Numbers. The law librarian may be able to assist you with your search as well if you are having difficulty using the Digests.

If this response was helpful, please mark it as helpful or as a best answer. The response provided herein is for informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice, nor does it establish or intend to establish an attorney-client relationship. You should always speak with a licensed attorney regarding your legal rights before taking or not taking any particular action.

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