How do I Evict a Lodger that has no Lease?

Asked over 2 years ago - Easton, MA

I have a Lodger renting a room in my apt. He is very messy and keeps making attrempts to move into the rest of the apt even though i take all the things he puts in the kitchen/bathroom/living room and placing it back in his room. What set me off is he, rummaged though my things while i was out and got my information, then changed information on cable accounts to his liking and authorized himself to my cable account and took control of it. I need him out ASAP but want to do it leagally. Again, he has no Lease nor Proof of payment to me because he pays cash (something i didn't care about but it seems to be an advantage right now) Would he be considered a guest?

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Edward A. Prisby

    Pro

    Contributor Level 6

    Answered . I would have to know a few more things to be able to give you an adequate answer. By lodger, do you mean "tenant" or are you renting out a rooming house? If its a rooming house, I would want to check with the Town of Easton as to whether this is a permitted use before going further.

    Otherwise, it sounds like your tenant is a tenant at will, meaning he is entitled to a thirty-day Notice to Quit the premises. Once the thirty days has expired if he still has not left the premises, you can bring an action to evict him. It is called a "summery process" action and will be through your local district court.

Related Topics

Notice to vacate property

A notice to vacate is a written notice from a landlord telling a tenant to move by a certain date. Often you'll have 30 days to leave, but state laws vary.

Caspar S. Jivalagian

UNLAWFUL DETAINER GUIDELINE

A step-by-step approach to handling California Unlawful Detainer Actions NOTICE 3-Day-Notice to Cure or Quit: This notice is usually used when a tenant has failed to tender or if there is a... more

Renting property

Rentals are houses, apartments, or similar where the resident pays the building's owner for the right to live there, usually under the terms of a written lease.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

25,903 answers this week

3,041 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

25,903 answers this week

3,041 attorneys answering