How do i dissolve an Homeowners association?

Asked over 4 years ago - Everett, WA

They do Not maintain our street and I have never met them? Only 3 houses on the street and we All agree we don't want them? There are 2 different companies associated with this letter they sent us and when we contact them there is no response??

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Roger Thomas Dunaway

    Pro

    Contributor Level 8

    Answered . Most Homewoners' associations are formed as non-profit corporations. Check the Articles of Incorporation and the Bylaws first to see if these documents address how to dissolve the association. There may be a procedure whereby members (or the Board of Directors) can call a special meeting for that purpose. If not, legal action may be needed to have a court order the dissolution.

  2. Kevin Lee Britt

    Contributor Level 11

    Answered . Dissolving the homeowners association is an expensive and lengthy course of action that may well be out of reach given the high or unanimous owner approval required by the covenants. A firm letter to the association's board or property manager from an attorney could result in your maintenance concerns being addressed.

  3. Robert M Diamond

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . How you dissolve a homeowners association depends on state law and the kind of homeowners association. A condominium is different than a property owners association or a cooperative. You look to the state law on the correct entity and, if incorporated, the state law governing non-profit, non-stock corporations. Finally, you must determine whether a homeowners association was required by the local jurisdiction in connection with the zoning or subdivision approval for the development. Once you determine the process required by state law, you follow it and obtain approval from the requisite number of members of the homeowners association and file articles of dissolution for the corporation. You may also have to file a termination of any recorded covenants as well, unless the covenants can continue and make sense without an association. You should probably have a local lawyer look at these issues before you act.

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