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How do I cancel a hearing with Family Court?

Helmetta, NJ |

I recently filed a Motion for a non oral argument asking to relocate my children to another state. The hearing is set for October 25th. I want to cancel this hearing as I know my ex husband has hired an attorney and I do not have one and basically know I don't have a shot at winning. How do I cancel this with the court? Also, I thought that since I had requested a non oral argument that neither one of us was required to be there. Are we able to attend this hearing if we wanted to?

Attorney Answers 2

Posted

If the other party has not responded or filed a Cross-Motion to your Motion, you can withdraw your Motion. You should immediately go the family Court on Monday (you might be able to call them today before 4:30 pm) and withdraw the Motion.

Good luck.

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Posted

If a hearing date is scheduled for October 25th, I suggest you attend, and ask for appointed counsel if you cannot afford one. If no "hearing" has been scheduled, no appearance is necessary. Check whatver notice you received or call the clerk.

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1 comment

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Posted

The hearing that is scheduled is a non oral argument. I was under the impression that means no one is able to attend and that is entirely up to the judge without hearing either of our sides.