How do I approach my lawyer about being dishonest with me about my PIP through my car insurance?

Asked over 4 years ago - Allentown, PA

I was involved in a MVA in 2007 and have been seeing my chiropractor, who was referred to me by "my lawyer" since that time. All of my medical treatments have been covered through my PIP which covers $50,000. My chiropractor referred me to a doctor for a consult. Before being seen, this doctor wants to review all of my records of previous treatments. The doctor's receptionist called me back advising me that she hasn't received the records from one of the doctors I was treated by. She also mentioned that my claim with Allstate is closed so they would be using my personal insurance. I called "my lawyer" and asked him about this and he states that I have "exhausted" all of my medical with Allstate.

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Jerry Robert Knafo

    Pro

    Contributor Level 9

    Answered . Your attorney can request a copy of your entire first party medical file from the insurance company. Included in that file should be a payout sheet itemizing what amounts were actually paid by the company. You will then be able to determine if, in fact, your medical coverage has been exhausted.
    Good luck!

  2. Daniel Malis

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . Sorry about your confusion.

    I would trust your own attorney before I would trust what the insurer advised you, especially when they state that a case has been 'closed'. Of itself, that's a meaningless phrase, and may not mean that your claim is terminated, exhausted, or legally precluded.

    Call your attorney and sit down with him (or her) to discuss the case status; let them know what the provider told you. Keep asking questions until you feel clear in your mind that your claim is viable and being diligently pursued. You have a right to feel completely informed about decisions made during your representation, and to understand what's going on with your case. Hopefully, you can work through the issue and resolve it. If not; you need to consult a local, Pennsylvania attorney to review the file and make sure that your rights have been, and continue to be, preserved and pursued.

  3. Daniel Malis

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . Sorry about your confusion.

    I would trust your own attorney before I would trust what the insurer advised you, especially when they state that a case has been 'closed'. Of itself, that's a meaningless phrase, and may not mean that your claim is terminated, exhausted, or legally precluded.

    Call your attorney and sit down with him (or her) to discuss the case status; let them know what the provider told you. Keep asking questions until you feel clear in your mind that your claim is viable and being diligently pursued. You have a right to feel completely informed about decisions made during your representation, and to understand what's going on with your case. Hopefully, you can work through the issue and resolve it. If not; you need to consult a local, Pennsylvania attorney to review the file and make sure that your rights have been, and continue to be, preserved and pursued.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

26,626 answers this week

2,806 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

26,626 answers this week

2,806 attorneys answering