Skip to main content

How do I Appel a judges desion on my son? He

Fitchburg, MA |

My ex and her boyfriend kept my son from me for a year and a half. I filled in probate they allowed me to see my son for 10 days straight, then I was ordered to give him back to the mother and I just got the order today and it says I get to visit him once a week on Sundays. How would I appeal this?

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Talk to an attorney and file that ASAP. You have a very limited amount of time to do so. You need to have a point of law that the judge ruled upon erroneously. In matters of discretion the trial judge has a wide amount of latitude and deference in their rulings.


  2. If you cannot afford a lawyer because your income and family size puts you at 125% of the federal poverty guideline, you might be able to get an attorney from the legal services helpline. Search Find Legal Aid. The Massachusetts Bar Association, Worcester County Bar Association and several others have lawyer referral services with pro bono or reduced fee panels. If you are able to come up with a significant initial advance fee deposit, many lawyers will take a case with a payment plan.

    As far as how to appeal, that question is answered to some extent in the statutes and rules I have linked below.

    NOTE: This answer is made available by the lawyer for educational purposes only. By using or participating in this site you understand that there is no attorney client privilege between you and the attorney responding. This site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your area who regularly practices in the subject matter which your question is about. You should develop an attorney client relationship with the lawyer of your choice so that your communications will be subject to the attorney client privilege and have the other benefits of a professional relationship. The law changes frequently and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The information and materials provided are general in nature, and may not apply to a specific matter as partially described in the question.


  3. Your question is too involved to be answered her. You need an attorney to assist you.