How do I answer Plaintiff's request for admissions, interrogatories, and request for production of documents to defendant in FL?

Asked over 4 years ago - Orlando, FL

I am being sued in a Florida County Court by a JDB's staff attorney, for a debt that was charged off by the original credit card issuer. I answered my 20 day summons with a graduated denial, but it was not a sworn graduated denial. I was not aware that it needed to be sworn. I have now been sent a Plaintiff's request for admissions to Defendant, a notice of service of Plaintiff's interrogatories to Defendant, and Plaintiff's request for production of documents to Defendant. They are asking for my ss#, birthdate,and place of employment, as well as banking iinformation. Is this legal? Do I have to give them my ss#? I am currently on unemployment, and believe they cannot garnish that, if they get a judgment, T or F? How do I answer as to whether I had this cc and made purchases on it?

Additional information

Do I deny or object to everything, other than my address? Do I object to production of documents? I have less than a week left to answer, and cannot produce these records, at this time, or possibly never. I have never spoke too, or signed anything with this JDB, and feel they should not be entitled to sue me for a debt that I did not make with them. Even if I had the money to pay this debt, which I don't, I would not want to pay it to a JDB. I would pay it to my original creditor, who has already charged it off, long ago. Also, are their any documents and requests that I should be asking the Plaintiff to produce? Such as, Request to Validate, or is it to late, or could it possibly hurt me in the long run?

Attorney answers (1)

  1. John David Campo

    Contributor Level 11

    Answered . Admissions that are not answered are deemed admitted. If you have a reaonable basis to deny any of the admissions, then do so. You can also object to specific Interrogatories or specific requests for production. Your answers to the Interrogatories must be notarized. Retain an attorney or go to legal aid, you're in way over your head.

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