How can Slander, libel, defamation be proven to the court in order to receive damages?

Asked 9 months ago - Denver, CO

I have acquired a letter that has accused me of financial exploitation of an elder. I believe this letter was provided to several attorneys, Colorado APS, and a CPA for the sole purpose of defaming my character. All of the allegations are completely false, in fact the writer was very well aware they were false. I can document all allegations to show they are complete falsehoods and the writer knew it.

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Edward C. Hopkins Jr.

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    Answered . Defamation victims may recover special and general damages if the evidence proves it is more likely than not that the defamation harmed them. Evidence that proves you lost income or business profits or that you lost professional licenses or credentials that enabled you to earn more income or business profits may prove special damages. Evidence that proves you incurred business or medical expenses as a direct result of the defamation may prove special damages. Evidence that you suffered emotional distress, loss of quality of life, or loss of reputation may prove general damages. You should consult a defamation attorney to learn more about what evidence can prove you suffered damages and how it may be used in court.

  2. Christian K. Lassen II

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . Defamation lawyers typically want a $5000.00 retainer up front just to begin work, so unless you sustained a significant monetary loss, the case could cost you thousands more than you would recover.

  3. Christopher Daniel Leroi

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . As my colleagues indicate, first you have to show economic damages and that the statements that were made were knowingly false. No attorney will take the case in Denver on a contingency basis and so you will need to pay an hourly rate. I agree that an attorney will probably charge you an initial retainer of $5,000 or more to take on your case. Shop around on Avvo through the Find a Lawyers option.

    The information provided in this answer does not create an attorney-client relationship and is not considered to... more

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