How can I have my daughters' father parental rights taken away?

Asked over 3 years ago - Detroit, MI

I paid for a paternity test because he was denying my daughter. The test came back that he was 99.99% the father of my child. He would not sign the birth certificate or have his name added to the birth certificate. Since then he has not seen her much and doesn't show up when he makes a date to see her. She doesn't see him. I just don't want to deal with him anymore and would like for him to be out of our life. He doesn't support us in any way and I would like his parental rights taken away because he hasn't did much for her since she's been born but he has taken care of his other kids. I'm not bitter I just want what's best for my daughter. She doesn't need someone in and out of her life when he feels like it. He's not being a father to her anyway.

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    Answered . I agree with Mr. Poulson, absent extreme circumstances, it isn't fair to deny your daughter her legal father, even if he's inconsistent or worse. It is better to try to obtain some child support and if you don't need it now, put it aside for your daughter for later. You can't make the man be a loving, supportive father, but you may be able to make him pay his share. When your daughter grows up, she can decide to sever ties "legally" if she so desires. In the meantime, if someone comes into your life that really wants to be her father, then you can consider terminating the biological father's parental rights so you can proceed with an adoption. Otherwise, don't do it. Good luck!

    IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE: Ms. Brown’s response to the question above is not legal advice and it does not create an... more
  2. Answered . What might be best for your daughter long term would be to file for child support. Fifteen years or so, she could have enough money to go to college. Is it really fair to her to give up the money just because you are tired of his nonsense? You have the test. Either file for support, hire a family law attorney to file for you, or contact legal aid. Every month that goes by is money lost forever for you daughter.

    How will you answer her when she is ready for college? "I was too mad, sick of the nonsense, unwilling to go to bat for you, to care about your future?" Think ahead for your daughter.

    We do not have a client/attorney relationship until you make an appointment, we discuss your case face to face, I... more
  3. Answered . If you were not married to the father, he never signed an affidavit of parentage, or you did not file a paternity lawsuit, then he does NOT currently have any parental rights. The only way the father of a child born out-of-wedlock can obtain any parental rights in Michigan is to sign an affidavit of parentage with the mother or through a paternity lawsuit. That fact that you had a paternity test taken through a private company that determined that he is biologically the father, does NOT make him the legal father. In other words, he has no parental rights to be taken away.

    However, I agree with the other answers that you should consider filing a paternity action in order to get a court order for child support. In a paternity lawsuit the court must include a provision for child support, but the court need not rule on custody. Instead, the mother is typically awarded sole custody as a default. If the father wants custody or parenting time, the burden is on him to request it from the court.

    P.S. If the child ever requires any welfare assistance or benefits a special prosecutor in your county will be assigned to file a paternity action against the alleged father. If you do not cooperate with the special prosecutor, your benefits would be penalized. The state does not like to pay benefits for a child when there is a parent that should be paying support. If the special prosecutor initiates a paternity action, the alleged father may be eligible for a court appointed attorney. However, the court appointed attorney can only help defend against the claim of paternity and the amount of child support ordered. The court appointed attorney cannot help the father (or mother) in any claim for custody or support.

    DISCLAIMER: This answer is provided as general information, which may not be appropriate for the specific facts of... more

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